birds

A Quote by James Allen on achievement, angels, birds, dreams, soul, time, and vision

The greatest achievement was at first and for a time a dream. The oak sleeps in the acorn; the bird waits in the egg; and in the highest vision of the soul a waking angel stirs. Dreams are the seedlings of realities.

James Allen (1864 - 1912)

Source: As a Man Thinketh

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by William Wordsworth on birds

in

O Cuckoo! shall I call thee bird, Or but a wandering voice?

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: To the Cuckoo.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on birds

in

In this sequestered nook how sweet To sit upon my orchard seat And birds and flowers once more to greet. . . .

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on birds, birth, charm, christmas, power, seasons, spirit, and time

Cock-crow at Christmas Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long; And then, they say, no spirit can walk abroad; The nights are wholesome; then no planets strike, No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm, So hallow'd and so gracious is the time.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William S. Ogdon on art, birds, character, clarity, conscience, contentment, control, determination, discovery, economics, effort, enemies, ethics, fashion, goodness, government, happiness, heart, individuality, life, listening, luxury, money,

The Art of Happiness There was never a time when so much official effort was being expended to produce happiness, and probably never a time when so little attention was paid by the individual to creating and personal qualities that make for it. What one misses most today is the evidence of widespread personal determination to develop a character that will, in itself, given any reasonable odds, make for happiness. Our whole emphasis is on the reform of living conditions, of increased wages, of controls on the economic structure-the government approach-and so little on man improving himself. The ingredients of happiness are so simple that they can be counted on one hand. Happiness comes from within, and rests most securely on simple goodness and clear conscience. Religion may not be essential to it, but no one ins known to have gained it without a philosophy resting on ethical principles. Selfishness is its enemy; to make another happy is to be happy one's self. It is quiet, seldom found for long in crowds, most easily won in moments of solitude and reflection. It cannot be bought; indeed, money has very little to do with it. No one is happy unless he is reasonably well satisfied with himself, so that the quest for tranquility must of necessity begin with self-examination. We shall not often be content with what we discover in this scrutiny. There is much to do, and so little done. Upon this searching self-analysis, however, depends the discovery of those qualities that make each man unique, and whose development alone can bring satisfaction. Of all those who have tried, down the ages, to outline a program for happiness, few have succeeded so well as William Henry Channing, chaplain of the House of Representatives in the middle of the last century: "To live content with small means; so seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion; to be worthy . . . to study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly; to listen to the stars and birds, to babes and sages, with open heart; to bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occasions, hurry never; in a word to let the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious, grow up through the common." It will be noted that no government can do this for you; you must do it for yourself.

William S. Ogdon

Source: New York Times, Editorial Page, Dec. 30, 1945

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Longgood on birds

in

I continue to handpick the beetles, mosquitoes feast on me, birds eat the mosquitoes, something else eats the birds, and so on up and down the biotic pyramid.

William Longgood

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Longgood on birds, earth, garden, plants, and work

Morning is the best of all times in the garden. The sun is not yet hot. Sweet vapors rise from the earth. Night dew clings to the soil and makes plants glisten. Birds call to one another. Bees are already at work.

William Longgood

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Henry Channing on birds, contentment, fashion, heart, listening, luxury, spirituality, and study

To live content with small means; to seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion; to be worthy, not respectable, and wealthy, not rich; to study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly; to listen to stars and birds, babes and sages with open heart; to bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occasions, hurry never. In a word, to let the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious, grow up through the common. This is to be my symphony.

William Henry Channing (1810 - 1884)

Source: My Symphony

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on birds, country, death, generations, men, music, sensuality, and songs

That is no country for old men. The young In one another's arms, birds in the trees - Those dying generations-at their song, The salmon-falls, the mackerel-crowded seas, Fish, flesh, or fowl, commend all summer long Whatever is begotten, born, and dies. Caught in that sensual music all neglect Monuments of unaging intellect.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: The Tower, 1928. Sailing to Byzantium

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on birds and gold

in

I have read somewhere that in the Emperor's palace at Byzantium was a tree made of gold and silver, and artificial birds that sang.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: YEATS'S note

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content