William Wordsworth

1770 - 1850

A Quote by William Wordsworth on age, happiness, and youth

A happy youth, and their old age Is beautiful and free.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Fountain.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on beauty, grace, happiness, and melancholy

Elysian beauty, melancholy grace, Brought from a pensive though a happy place.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Laodamia.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on bitterness and thought

But hushed be every thought that springs From out the bitterness of things.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Elegiac Stanzas. Addressed to Sir G. H. B.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on books, dreams, good, happiness, purity, and world

Dreams, books, are each a world; and books, we know, Are a substantial world, both pure and good. Round these, with tendrils strong as flesh and blood, Our pastime and our happiness will grow.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Personal Talk. Stanza 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on nature and soul

Recognizes ever and anon The breeze of Nature stirring in his soul.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book iv.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on brothers

How fast has brother followed brother, From sunshine to the sunless land!

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Extempore Effusion upon the Death of James Hogg.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on mystery and world

That blessed mood, In which the burden of the mystery, In which the heavy and the weary weight Of all this unintelligible world, Is lightened.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Lines completed a few miles above Tintern Abbey.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on glory, joy, madness, mountains, poets, pride, soul, thought, and youth

I thought of Chatterton, the marvellous boy, The sleepless soul that perished in his pride; Of him who walked in glory and in joy, Following his plough, along the mountain-side. By our own spirits we are deified; We Poets in our youth begin in gladness, But thereof come in the end despondency and madness.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Resolution and Independence. Stanza 7.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth

The cattle are grazing, Their heads never raising; There are forty feeding like one!

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Cock is crowing.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth

Like,-but oh how different!

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Yes, it was the Mountain Echo.

Contributed by: Zaady

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