William Wordsworth

1770 - 1850

A Quote by William Wordsworth on earth and power

A power is passing from the earth.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Lines on the expected Dissolution of Mr. Fox.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on beginning, darkness, good, meaning, prayer, and words

"What is good for a bootless bene?" With these dark words begins my tale; And their meaning is, Whence can comfort spring When prayer is of no avail?

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Force of Prayer.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on imperfection, praise, and prayer

The imperfect offices of prayer and praise.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book i.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on charity and duty

The primal duties shine aloft, like stars; The charities that soothe and heal and bless Are scattered at the feet of man like flowers.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book ix.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth

A primrose by a river's brim A yellow primrose was to him, And it was nothing more.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Peter Bell. Part i. Stanza 12.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on excess, familiarity, happiness, and luxury

Sad fancies do we then affect, In luxury of disrespect To our own prodigal excess Of too familiar happiness.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Ode to Lycoris.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on heart and quiet

The harvest of a quiet eye, That broods and sleeps on his own heart.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: A Poet's Epitaph. Stanza 13.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth

The rainbow comes and goes, And lovely is the rose.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Intimations of Immortality. Stanza 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on love

in

But how can he expect that others should Build for him, sow for him, and at his call Love him, who for himself will take no heed at all?

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Resolution and Independence. Stanza 6.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on crime and time

in

That kill the bloom before its time, And blanch, without the owner's crime, The most resplendent hair.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Lament of Mary Queen of Scots.

Contributed by: Zaady

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