William Shakespeare

1564 - 1616

A Quote by William Shakespeare on affection, god, heresy, learning, and praise

I praise God for you, sir: your reasons at dinner have been sharp and sententious; pleasant without scurrility, witty without affectation, audacious without impudency, learned without opinion, and strange with-out heresy.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Love’s Labours Lost, Act 5, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on deed

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For Sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Sonnet 94

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on faults, lies, and men

Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud; Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun, And loathsome canker lies in sweetest bud. All men make faults.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Sonnet 35

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on peace

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Prithee, peace: I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more is none.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: MACBETH, Act 1, Scene 7

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare

That's a valiant flea that dares eat his breakfast on the lip of a lion.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: KING HENRY V, Act 3, Scene 7

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on company

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Company, villanous company, hath been the spoil of me.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry IV, Part i, Act 3, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare

Comparisons are odorous.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Much Ado About Nothing

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, judgment, and men

Men judge by the complexion of the sky The state and inclination of the day:

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard II, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on conscience and cowardice

Conscience is but a word that cowards use, Devised at first to keep the strong in awe.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: KING RICHARD III, Act 5, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on cities, conscience, cowardice, danger, gold, lies, obstacles, persuasion, reward, spirit, trust, and wives

FIRST MURDERER: WHERE IS THY CONSCIENCE NOW? SECOND MURDERER: In the Duke of Gloucester's purse FIRST MURDERER: So when he opens his purse to give us our reward, thy conscience flies out. SECOND MURDERER: Let it go; there's few or none will entertain it. FIRST MURDERER: How if it come to thee again? SECOND MURDERER: I'll not meddle with it: it is a dangerous thing: it makes a man a coward: a man cannot steal, but it accuseth him; he cannot swear, but it checks him; he cannot lie with his neighbour's wife, but it detects him: it is a blushing shamefast spirit that multiplies in a man's bosom; it fills one full of obstacles: it made me once restore a purse of gold, that I found: it beggars any man that keeps it: it is turned out of all towns and cities for a dangerous thing; and every man that means to live well, endeavours to trust to himself and to live without it. FIRST MURDERER: 'Zounds, it is even now at my elbow, persuading me not to kill the duke.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard III, Act I, scene iv

Contributed by: Zaady

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