Thomas Mann

1875 - 1955

A Quote by Thomas Mann

For the beautiful word begets the beautiful deed.

Thomas Mann (1875 - 1955)

Source: The Magic Mountain ch4 pg 159

Contributed by: Monk

A Quote by Thomas Mann on integral art

...Art is the spirit in matter, the natural instinct toward humanization, that is, toward the spiritualization of life.

Thomas Mann (1875 - 1955)

Contributed by: sean

A Quote by Thomas Mann on imagination

What a glorious gift is imagination, and what satisfaction it affords!

Thomas Mann (1875 - 1955)

Source: Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Thomas Mann on beauty, birth, opposites, originality, poetry, and solitude

Solitude gives birth to the original in us, to beauty unfamiliar and perilous - to poetry. But it also gives birth to the opposite: to the perverse, the illicit, the absurd.

Thomas Mann (1875 - 1955)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Mann on death, goodness, and love

For the sake of goodness and love, Man shall let Death have No sovereignty over his thoughts.

Thomas Mann (1875 - 1955)

Source: Magic Mountain

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Mann

No man remains quite what he was when he recognizes himself.

Thomas Mann (1875 - 1955)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Mann on death

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A man's dying is more the survivors' affair than his own.

Thomas Mann (1875 - 1955)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Mann on opposites and truth

A great truth is a truth whose opposite is also a great truth.

Thomas Mann (1875 - 1955)

Source: Essay on Freud. 1937.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Mann on lust, mathematics, remedies, and study

I tell them that if they will occupy themselves with the study of mathematics they will find in it the best remedy against the lusts of the flesh.

Thomas Mann (1875 - 1955)

Source: The Magic Mountain. 1927.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Mann on behavior, impossibility, mathematics, men, students, and understanding

Some of the men stood talking in this room, and at the right of the door a little knot had formed round a small table, the center of which was the mathematics student, who ws eagerly talking. He had made the assertion that one could draw through a given point more than one parallel to a straight line; Frau Hagenström had cried out that this was impossible, and he had gone on to prove it so conclusively that his hearers were constrained to behave as though they understood.

Thomas Mann (1875 - 1955)

Source: Little Herr Friedemann.

Contributed by: Zaady

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