Thomas Jefferson

1743 - 1826

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on children, consequences, correction, education, future, good, ignorance, life, and vices

If the children are untaught, their ignorance and vices will in future life cost us much dearer in their consequences than it would have done in their correction by a good education.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on evil and pain

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Thomas Jefferson's Decalogue of Canons VIII. How much pain have cost us the evils which have never happened.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson's Decalogue of Canons IX. Take things always by their smooth handle.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on anger

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Thomas Jefferson's Decalogue of Canons X. When angry, count ten before you speak; if very angry, a hundred.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on habits, lies, and time

He who permits himself to tell a lie once finds it much easier to do it a second and third time till at length it becomes habitual.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on luxury, science, and value

. . . the science of calculation also is indispensable as far as the extraction of the square and cube roots: Algebra as far as the quadratic equation and the use of logarithms are often of value in ordinary cases: but all beyond these is but a luxury; a delicious luxury indeed; but not to be in indulged in by one who is to have a profession to follow for his subsistence.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Source: J. Robert Oppenheimer "The Encouragement of Science" in I. Gordon and S. Sorkin (eds.) The Armchair Science Reader, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1959.

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on belief, money, posterity, and principles

I sincerely believe . . . that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity under the name of funding is but swindling futurity on a large scale.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on borrowing, constitution, government, money, power, war, and wishes

I wish it were possible to obtain a single amendment to our Constitution. I would be willing to depend on that alone for the reduction of the administration of our government; I mean an additional article taking from the Federal Government the power of borrowing. I now deny their power of making paper money or anything else a legal tender. I know that to pay all proper expenses within the year would, in case of war, be hard on us. But not so hard as ten wars instead of one. For wars could be reduced in that proportion; besides that the State governments would be free to lend their credit in borrowing quotas.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on debt, generations, principles, and world

It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on america, benevolence, certainty, character, christianity, country, effort, fatherhood, innocence, inventions, jesus, morality, religion, support, and traditions

The efforts of certain Christian factions to cast themselves as the inheritors of America's Judaeo-Christian tradition find little support in the embarrassing heterodoxy of this Founding Father: "But the greatest of all reformers of the depraved religion of his own country was Jesus of Nazareth. Abstracting what is really his from the rubbish in which it is buried, easily distinguished by its lustre from the dross of his biographers, and as separable as the diamond from the dunghill, we have the outlines of a system of the most sublime morality which has ever fallen from the lips of man; outlines which it is lamentable he did not live to fill up. . . . The establishment of the innocent and genuine character of this benevolent moralist, and the rescuing it from the imputation of imposture, which has resulted from artificial systems, invented by ultra-Christian sects, unauthorized by a single word ever uttered by him, is a most desirable object. . . ."

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Source: Letter to William Short, October 31 (Halloween), 1819

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