Sterling W. Sill

1903 - 1994

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on confidence, difficulty, education, god, good, intelligence, life, people, responsibility, selfishness, soul, and world

Certainly the greatest values in the world are human values, and the most worthwhile ambitions in people have to do with building human beings. The most important responsibility that God has ever laid upon the shoulders of any human being is that of making the best and the most of his own life. I heard of somebody once who said he was interested in doing the greatest amount of good for the greatest number, and that the greatest number was number one. That was himself. That may sound like a little bit of selfishness, but if that is selfishness, at least it is a very intelligent selfishness. Everyone has a right to be interested in himself, and I am confident that God wants us to be interested in ourselves first; that is, the first soul that anyone should bring to God should be his own soul. We cannot do very much for anyone else until we have first done something for ourselves. That is, it is pretty difficult to give someone else an education unless we have some education ourselves. It is pretty hard to get someone else to think unless we ourselves are thinkers.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Source: Speech at BYU, November 9 1965

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on bankers, behavior, friendship, learning, reason, struggle, time, water, and wisdom

A young man came to Socrates one time and said, "Mr. Socrates, I have come 1,600 miles to talk to you about wisdom and learning." He said, "You are a man of wisdom and learning, and I would like to be a man of wisdom and learning." Socrates said, "Come follow me," and he led the way down to the seashore. They waded out into the water up to their waists, and then Socrates turned on his friend and held his head under the water. His friend struggled and kicked and bucked and tried to get away, but Socrates held him down. Now if you hold someone's head under the water long enough, he will eventually become fairly peaceable. And after this man had stopped struggling, Socrates laid him out on the bank to dry, and he went back to the market place. After the young man had dried out a little bit, he came back to Socrates to find the reason for this rather unusual behavior. Socrates said to him, "When your head was under the water, what was the one thing you wanted more than anything else?" And the man said, "More than anything else, I wanted air." Socrates said, "All right, when you want wisdom and learning like you wanted air, you won't have to ask anybody to give it to you."

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Source: February 9, 1965, at BYU

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on joy, life, and promises

Those who wallow around in the sickness of their immorality and degeneracy get very little joy out of life here and certainly not much promise is held out for them hereafter.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

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