Shui-ch'ing Tzu

between 1600 & 1911 -

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on action, knowledge, progress, sincerity, teachers, and taoism

If you are sincere in seeking this knowledge, you must look for a teacher and humbly ask your teacher to show you the opening of the Mysterious Gate. From then on, if your actions follow the Tao, you will progress. If your actions stray from the Tao, your progress will be halted.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 19

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on heart, students, teachers, and understanding

The inner teachings must be transmitted orally and personally from teacher to student before they can be understood from the heart.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 13

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on beginning, earth, existence, goodness, heaven, life, energy, and taoism

The Tao is supreme goodness. It has no form and is limitless. It is formless because there is no visible trace of its existence. The Tao is that energy that has existed from the beginning when there was neither structure nor differentiation. It is the source of life in heaven and on earth. It creates and all things.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 4

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on desires

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Desires are egotistic cravings.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 47

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on mind and stillness

The mind tends toward stillness but it is opposed by craving.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 41

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on control, desires, existence, heaven, and mind

When the mind is disturbed, it is attracted by ten thousand things. With attraction, craving will arise. With craving, the desire to obtain things to satisfy craving will emerge. The mind that desires is rooted in earthly existence and is controlled by the pa-k'ua of Later Heaven.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 131

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on clarity, desires, emptiness, existence, heaven, mind, and stillness

True emptiness exists when the mind is clear and all forms have disappeared. Externally, there are no objects. Internally, there is no mind. There is only emptiness. In this state even emptiness does not exist. In true emptiness there is no space, no desire, no will; there are no appearances, no thoughts. All realms of existence are dissolved. In absolute stillness there is no self and no other. There is only Earlier Heaven in its undifferentiated whole.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 69

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on death, heaven, life, mind, mortality, and taoism

When the mortal mind is dead, the mind of Tao can live. . . . When the mind of Tao lives, no thoughts can arise. When no thoughts arise, one returns to Earlier Heaven.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 76

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu

Center your thoughts on the One. . . .

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 122

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on emptiness, justice, and thinking

Regarding emptiness is not just merely sitting still and stopping thinking.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 70

Contributed by: Zaady

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