Seneca

4 BC - 65 AD

A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on fear and ignorance

Ignorance is the cause of fear. -Timendi causa est nescire

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on god and good

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In every good man a God doth dwell.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

Source: H. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1988.

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A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on judgment

If you judge, investigate.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on kindness and opportunity

Wherever there is a human being, there is an opportunity for kindness.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on laughter

All things are cause for either laughter or weeping.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on crime and encouragement

He who does not prevent a crime when he can, encourages it.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on justice, laws, and persuasion

Laws do not persuade just because they threaten.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on learning and men

Even while they teach, men learn.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on learning, life, and schools

We learn not in the school, but in life.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on anxiety, blessings, bravery, certainty, cheerfulness, constancy, contentment, darkness, dependence, duty, equality, fear, fortune, future, god, good, greatness, happiness, hope, indifference, joy, mankind, mind, people

True happiness is to understand our duties toward God and man; to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future; not to amuse ourselves with either hopes or fears, but to rest satisfied with what we have, which is abundantly sufficient; for he that is so wants nothing. The great blessings of mankind are with us, and within our reach; but we shut our eyes and, like people in the dark, fall foul of the very thing we search for without finding it. Tranquility is a certain equality of mind which no condition of fortune can either exalt or depress. There must be sound mind to make a happy man; there must be constancy in all conditions, a care for the things of this world but without anxiety; and such an indifference to the bounties of fortune that either with them or without them we may live content. True joy is serene. . . . The seat of it is within, and there is no cheerfulness like the resolution of a brave mind that has fortune under its feat. It is an invincible greatness of mind not to be elevated or dejected with good or ill fortune. A wise man is content with his lot, whatever it be - without wishing for what he has not.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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