Samuel Butler

1612 - 1680

A Quote by Samuel Butler on college, duty, genius, and schools

Genius is a nuisance, and it is the duty of schools and colleges to abate it by setting genius-traps in its way.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Notebooks.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on genius and trouble

Genius is a supreme capacity for getting its possessors into trouble.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: The Way of All Flesh.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on genius, money, time, and trouble

[Genius] is no respecter of time, trouble, money or persons, the four things around which human affairs turn most persistently.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Notebooks.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on life

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I consider being ill as one of the great pleasures of life, provided one is not too ill.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Notebooks.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on distrust, people, and service

The most important service rendered by the press and the magazines is that of educating people to approach printed matter with distrust.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on wit

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Neither have they hearts to stay, Nor wit enough to run away.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Hudibras, pt. 3, cto. 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler

Nick Machiavel had ne'er a trick, Though he gave his name to our Old Nick.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Hudibras. Part iii. Canto i. Line 1313.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on animals

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Man is the only animal that can remain on friendly terms with the victims he intends to eat until he eats them.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on animals

in

Man is the only animal that laughs and has a state legislature.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on doubt, guidance, and writing

When a man is in doubt about this or that in his writing, it will often guide him if he asks himself how it will tell a hundred years hence.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Notebooks

Contributed by: Zaady

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