Robert Louis Stevenson

1850 - 1894

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on habits and happiness

The habit of being happy enables one to be freed, or largely freed, from the domination of outward conditions.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on duty and happiness

There is no duty we so much underrate as the duty of being happy.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Source: Treasure Island

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on day, judgment, and plants

Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on identity and idleness

To be idle requires a strong sense of personal identity.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on soul and world

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To know what you prefer instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on happiness and world

The world is so full of a number of things; I am sure we should all be as happy as kings.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson

I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me, And what can be the use of him is more than I can see. He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head; And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Source: A Child’s Garden of Verses, My Shadow, stanza 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on politics, preparation, and thought

Politics is perhaps the only profession for which no preparation is thought necessary.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on belief, change, devil, generosity, justice, mind, politics, and relaxation

These are my politics: to change what we can; to better what we can; but still to bear in mind that man is but a devil weakly fettered by some generous beliefs and impositions; and for no word however sounding, and no cause however just and pious, to relax the stricture on these bonds.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Source: The Dynamiter

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on good and rest

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There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, that it behooves all of us not to talk about the rest of us.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

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