Richard Brinsley Sheridan

1751 - 1816

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on conscience and politics

Conscience has no more to do with gallantry than it has with politics.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Duenna. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on understanding

Egad, I think the interpreter is the hardest to be understood of the two!

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Critic. Act i. Sc. 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on falsehood and heart

Had I a heart for falsehood framed, I ne'er could injure you.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Duenna. Act i. Sc. 5.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan

He is the very pine-apple of politeness!

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Rivals. Act iii. Sc. 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on character and death

Here is the whole set! a character dead at every word.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: School for Scandal. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on character

I leave my character behind me.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: School for Scandal. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on hope

in

I ne'er could any lustre see In eyes that would not look on me; I ne'er saw nectar on a lip But where my own did hope to sip.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Duenna. Act i. Sc. 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on learning

A progeny of learning.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Rivals. Act i. Sc. 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on garden

in

Won't you come into the garden? I would like my roses to see you.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: To a young lady. Attrib. in The Perfect Hostess

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on attitude, heart, ideas, justice, men, mercy, mind, pride, and purity

Justice-august and pure, the abstract idea of all that would be perfect in the spirits and the inspirations of men!-where the mind rises; where the heart expands; where the countenance is ever placid and benign; where her favorite attitude is to stoop to the unfortunate; to hear their cry and to help them; to rescue and relieve; to succor and save; majestic, from its mercy; venerable, from its Lutility; uplifted, without pride; firm without obduracy; beneficent in each preference; lovely, though in her frown!

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Contributed by: Zaady

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