Richard Brinsley Sheridan

1751 - 1816

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on learning

A progeny of learning.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Rivals. Act i. Sc. 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on love

in

An oyster may be crossed in love.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: he Critic. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan

An unforgiving eye, and a damned disinheriting countenance.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: School for Scandal. Act v. Sc. 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan

As headstrong as an allegory on the banks of the Nile.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Rivals. Act iii. Sc. 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on purpose

in

As there are three of us come on purpose for the game, you won't be so cantankerous as to spoil the party by sitting out.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Rivals. Act v. Sc. 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on impossibility

Certainly nothing is unnatural that is not physically impossible.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Critic. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on conscience and politics

Conscience has no more to do with gallantry than it has with politics.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Duenna. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on understanding

Egad, I think the interpreter is the hardest to be understood of the two!

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: The Critic. Act i. Sc. 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on attitude, heart, ideas, justice, men, mercy, mind, pride, and purity

Justice-august and pure, the abstract idea of all that would be perfect in the spirits and the inspirations of men!-where the mind rises; where the heart expands; where the countenance is ever placid and benign; where her favorite attitude is to stoop to the unfortunate; to hear their cry and to help them; to rescue and relieve; to succor and save; majestic, from its mercy; venerable, from its Lutility; uplifted, without pride; firm without obduracy; beneficent in each preference; lovely, though in her frown!

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Brinsley Sheridan on facts, honor, imagination, and memory

The Right Honorable gentleman is indebted to his memory for his jests, and to his imagination for his facts.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816)

Source: Speech in reply to Mr. Dundas. Sheridaniana.

Contributed by: Zaady

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