Reginald Horace Blyth

1898 - 1964

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on brevity, experience, feeling, literature, nature, quality, rest, seasons, and world

It is not merely the brevity by which the haiku isolates a particular group of phenomena from all the rest; nor its suggestiveness, through which it reveals a whole world of experience. It is not only in its remarkable use of the season word, by which it gives us a feeling of a quarter of the year; nor its faint all-pervading humour. Its peculiar quality is its self-effacing, self-annihilative nature, by which it enables us, more than any other form of literature, to grasp the thing-in-itself.

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Zen Quotes — Haiku, Volume 4, p. 980.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on day, life, meaning, and mountains

The sun shines, snow falls, mountains rise and valleys sink, night deepens and pales into day, but it is only very seldom that we attend to such things. . . . When we are grasping the inexpressible meaning of these things, this is life, this is living. To do this twenty-four hours a day is the Way of Haiku. It is having life more abundantly.

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Haiku, Volume 1, p.11

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on country, death, drinking, giving, life, losing, and winning

Thus we see that the all important thing is not killing or giving life, drinking or not drinking, living in the town or the country, being unlucky or lucky, winning or losing. It is how we win, how we lose, how we live or die, finally, how we choose.

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Zen Quotes

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on life, men, and world

If all men lead mechanical, unpoetical lives, this is the real nihilism, the real undoing of the world.

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Zen Quotes

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on creation, discovery, experience, nature, and poetry

Or, to express this in another way, suggested to me by Professor Suzuki, in connection with "seeing into our own nature, poetry is the something that we see, but the seeing and the something are one; without the seeing there is no something, no something, no seeing. There is neither discovery nor creation: only the perfect, indivisible experience.

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Zen in English Literature and Oriental Classics, p.84

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on poetry and safety

Regarding R. H. Blyth: Blyth is sometimes perilous, naturally, since he's a high-handed old poem himself, but he's also sublime - and who goes to poetry for safety anyway.

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Zen Quotes — J. D. Salinger

Contributed by: Zaady

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