Reginald Horace Blyth

1898 - 1964

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on books, interest, poetry, popularity, schools, time, writers, and zen

Regarding R. H. Blyth: Blyth's four volume Haiku became especially popular at this time [1950's] because his translations were based on the assumption that the haiku was the poetic expression of Zen. Not surprisingly, his books attracted the attention of the Beat school, most notably writers such as Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder and Jack Kerouac, all of whom had a prior interest in Zen.

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Zen Quotes — George Swede, Haiku in English in North America

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on books

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Regarding R. H. Blyth: For translations, the best books are still those by R. H. Blyth. . . .

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Zen Quotes — Michael Dylan Welch, Want Fries with Those Haiku, 2000

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on books, organize, and seasons

Regarding R. H. Blyth: The first book in English based on the saijiki is R. H. Blyth's Haiku, published in four volumes from 1949 to 1952. After the first, background volume, the remaining three consist of a collection of Japanese haiku with translations, all organized by season, and within the seasons by traditional categories and about three hundred seasonal topics.

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: William J. Higginson, The Haiku Seasons, 1996, p. 119 [saijiki]

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on men

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Regarding R. H. Blyth: Two men who may be called pillars of the Western haiku movement, Harold G. Henderson and R. H. Blyth. . . .

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Zen Quotes — Elizabeth Searle Lamb, A Haiku Path, p. 5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on art and zen

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Art is frozen Zen

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Zen Quotes

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reginald Horace Blyth on poetry and safety

Regarding R. H. Blyth: Blyth is sometimes perilous, naturally, since he's a high-handed old poem himself, but he's also sublime - and who goes to poetry for safety anyway.

Reginald Horace Blyth (1898 - 1964)

Source: Zen Quotes — J. D. Salinger

Contributed by: Zaady

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