Percy Shelley

1792 - 1822

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on power

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The awful shadow of some unseen Power Floats, tho' unseen, amongst us.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Hymn to Intellectual Beauty.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on boldness and earth

What! alive, and so bold, O earth?

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Written on hearing the news of the death of Napoleon.

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A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on hope and work

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Work without hope draws nectar in a sieve, And hope without an object can not live.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on age, beginning, earth, and world

The world's great age begins anew, The golden years return, The earth doth like a snake renew Her winter weeds outworn.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on familiarity and love

Familiar acts are beautiful through love.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on best friend and friendship

Have you not heard When a man marries, dies, or turns Hindoo, His best friends hear no more of him?

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Letter to Maria Gisborne

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A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on death, life, and sleep

Death is the veil which those who live call life; They sleep, and it is lifted.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Prometheus Unbound

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A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on despair and world

Then black despair, The shadow of a starless night, was thrown Over the world in which I moved alone.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: The Revolt of Islam. Dedication, Stanza 6.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on good, goodness, love, needs, power, tears, and wisdom

The good want power, but to weep barren tears. The powerful goodness want: worse need for them. The wise want love; and those who love want wisdom.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on criticism, expectation, and merit

In the firm expectation that when London shall be a habitation of bitterns, when St. Paul and Westminster Abbey shall stand shapeless and nameless ruins in the midst of an unpeopled marsh, when the piers of Waterloo Bridge shall become the nuclei of islets of reeds and osiers, and cast the jagged shadows of their broken arches on the solitary stream, some Transatlantic commentator will be weighing in the scales of some new and now unimagined system of criticism the respective merits of the Bells and the Fudges and their historians.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Dedication to Peter Bell.

Contributed by: Zaady

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