Percy Shelley

1792 - 1822

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on art, death, love, memory, and music

Music, when soft voices die, Vibrates in the memory; Odors, when sweet violets sicken, Live within the sense they quicken. Rose leaves, when the rose is dead, Are heaped for the beloved's bed; And so thy thoughts, when thou art gone, Love itself shall slumber on.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Music, when soft Voices die.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on songs

in

Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thoughts.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on poetry

in

Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: A Defense of Poetry

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on poets and world

Poets are the unacknowledged legislatures of the world.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: A Defense of Poetry

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on despair and world

Then black despair, The shadow of a starless night, was thrown Over the world in which I moved alone.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: The Revolt of Islam. Dedication, Stanza 6.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on good, goodness, love, needs, power, tears, and wisdom

The good want power, but to weep barren tears. The powerful goodness want: worse need for them. The wise want love; and those who love want wisdom.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on criticism, expectation, and merit

In the firm expectation that when London shall be a habitation of bitterns, when St. Paul and Westminster Abbey shall stand shapeless and nameless ruins in the midst of an unpeopled marsh, when the piers of Waterloo Bridge shall become the nuclei of islets of reeds and osiers, and cast the jagged shadows of their broken arches on the solitary stream, some Transatlantic commentator will be weighing in the scales of some new and now unimagined system of criticism the respective merits of the Bells and the Fudges and their historians.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Dedication to Peter Bell.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on change and suffering

Nothing of him that doth fade But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: (Protestant Cemetery; Rome, Italy)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on good and imagination

The great instrument of moral good is the imagination.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on deed

in

For there are deeds which have no form, sufferings which have no tongue.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content