Lord Chesterfield Stanhope

1694 - 1773

A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on ridicule and truth

Ridicule is the best test of truth.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

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A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on mind and weakness

A weak mind is like a microscope, which magnifies trifling things but cannot receive great ones.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

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A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on worth

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Whatever is worth doing at all, is worth doing well.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

Source: Letter, March 10, 1746.

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A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on advice and needs

Advice is seldom welcome, and those who need it the most, like it the least.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

Source: —ALBERT W DAW COLLECTION

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A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on character

Be your character what it will, it will be known; and nobody will take it upon your word.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

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A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on good

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There is hardly anybody good for everything, and there is scarcely anybody who is absolutely good for nothing.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on character, effort, genius, purpose, and success

Firmness of purpose is one of the most necessary sinews of character, and one of the best instruments of success. Without it genius wastes its efforts in a maze of inconsistencies.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

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A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on modesty and praise

Modesty is the only sure bait when you angle for praise.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on songs

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Unlike my subject now shall be my song; It shall be witty, and it shan't be long.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

Source: Impromptu Lines.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on style and vulgarity

Style is the dress of thoughts . . .; if your style is homely, coarse, and vulgar, they will appear to as much disadvantage, and be as ill received, as your person, though ever so well-proportioned, would if dressed in rags, dirt, and tatters.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

Source: Letter, 24 Nov 1749; first published 1774.

Contributed by: Zaady

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