Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on crime, deed, love, and sorrow

Know ye the land where the cypress and myrtle Are emblems of deeds that are done in their clime? Where the rage of the vulture, the love of the turtle, Now melt into sorrow, now madden to crime!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: "The Bride of Abydos"

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on losing and men

in

Land of lost gods and godlike men.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 85.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on cities, feeling, and mountains

I live not in myself, but I become Portion of that around me; and to me High mountains are a feeling, but the hum Of human cities torture.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 72.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on farewells and love

I only know we loved in vain; I only feel-farewell! farewell!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Farewell! if ever fondest Prayer.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on water

in

Alas! our young affections run to waste, Or water but the desert.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 120.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Far as the breeze can bear, the billows foam.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: The Corsair, canto i. stanza 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on farewells, losing, and prayer

Farewell! if ever fondest prayer For other's weal avail'd on high, Mine will not all be lost in air, But waft thy name beyond the sky.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Farewell! if ever fondest Prayer.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on beauty

in

Fills The air around with beauty.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 49.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on songs

in

Fools are my theme, let satire be my song.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. Line 6.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on heart, love, rest, and soul

For the sword outwears its sheath, And the soul wears out the breast. And the heart must pause to breathe, And love itself have rest.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

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