John Keats

1795 - 1821

A Quote by John Keats on angels and clarity

E'en like the passage of an angel's tear That falls through the clear ether silently.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: To One who has been long in City pent.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on philosophy, poets, and virtue

What shocks the virtuous philosopher, delights the chameleon poet.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Letter to Richard Woodhouse (27 October 1818)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on angels, heaven, and philosophy

There was an awful rainbow once in heaven: We know her woof, her texture; she is given In the dull catalogue of common things. Philosophy will clip an angel's wings.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Lamia. Part ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on legends

in

Asleep in lap of legends old.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Eve of St. Agnes. Stanza 15.

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A Quote by John Keats on life and time

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One life,-a little gleam of time between two Eternities.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Hero as a Man of Letters.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on literature and men

Literary men are . . . a perpetual priesthood.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: State of German Literature.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on literature, soul, thinking, and thought

Literature is the Thought of thinking Souls.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on forgiveness, love, and water

Love in a hut, with water and crust, Is-Love, forgive us!-cinders, ashes, dust; Love in a palace is perhaps at last More grievous torment than a hermit's fast.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Lamia. Part ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on life

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The uttered part of a man's life, let us always repeat, bears to the unuttered, unconscious part a small unknown proportion. He himself never knows it, much less do others.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on good, judgment, and maxims

We are firm believers in the maxim that for all right judgment of any man or thing it is useful, nay, essential, to see his good qualities before pronouncing on his bad.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Goethe. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

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