John Keats

1795 - 1821

A Quote by John Keats on angels, heaven, and philosophy

There was an awful rainbow once in heaven: We know her woof, her texture; she is given In the dull catalogue of common things. Philosophy will clip an angel's wings.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Lamia. Part ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on departure, life, and time

It can be said of him, when he departed he took a Man's life with him. No sounder piece of British manhood was put together in that eighteenth century of Time.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on men, poets, and power

How does the poet speak to men with power, but by being still more a man than they?

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Burns. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on literature and men

Literary men are . . . a perpetual priesthood.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: State of German Literature.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on literature, soul, thinking, and thought

Literature is the Thought of thinking Souls.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on forgiveness, love, and water

Love in a hut, with water and crust, Is-Love, forgive us!-cinders, ashes, dust; Love in a palace is perhaps at last More grievous torment than a hermit's fast.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Lamia. Part ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on life

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The uttered part of a man's life, let us always repeat, bears to the unuttered, unconscious part a small unknown proportion. He himself never knows it, much less do others.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on good, judgment, and maxims

We are firm believers in the maxim that for all right judgment of any man or thing it is useful, nay, essential, to see his good qualities before pronouncing on his bad.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Goethe. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on grace

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Though a quarrel in the streets is a thing to be hated, the energies displayed in it are fine; the commonest man shows a grace in his quarrel.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Letter to George and Georgiana Keats (May 1819)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on lies and water

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Here lies one whose name was writ in water.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Contributed by: Zaady

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