John Donne

1572 - 1631

A Quote by John Donne on gold and soul

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Our two souls therefore which are one, Though I must go, endure not yet A breach, but an expansion, Like gold to airy thinness beat.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: A Valediction Forbidding Mourning, st. 6

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on soul

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Poor intricated soul! Riddling, perplexed, labyrinthical soul!

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Sermon XLVIII

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on body, chastity, honesty, integrity, justice, mind, modesty, purpose, reason, vices, virtue, and yielding

I call not that virginity a virtue, which resideth onely in the bodies integrity; much less if it be with a purpose of perpetually keeping it: for then it is a most inhumane vice. - But I call that Virginity a virtue which is willing and desirous to yield it self upon honest and lawfull terms, when just reason requireth; and until then, is kept with a modest chastity of body and mind.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Paradoxes and Problems, X

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on sleep

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But think that we Are but turned aside to sleep.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Song (Sweetest Love, I Do Not Go) st. 5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne

As well a well-wrought urn becomes The greatest ashes, as half-acre tombs.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Canonization, st. 4

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on country, love, and wonder

I wonder by my troth, what thou, and I Did, till we loved? were we not weaned till then? But sucked on country pleasures, childishly? Or snorted we in the seven sleepers' den?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Good Morrow, st. I

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on control, heaven, mystery, questions, and soul

Who ever comes to shroud me, do not harm Nor question much That subtle wreath of hair, which crowns my arm; The mystery, the sign you must not touch, For 'tis my outward soul, Viceroy to that, which then to heaven being gone, Will leave this to control, And keep these limbs, her provinces, from dissolution.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Funeral, st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on death, envy, and immortality

If poisonous minerals, and if that tree, Whose fruit threw death on else immortal us, If lecherous goats, if serpents envious Cannot be damned; alas; why should I be?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Holy Sonnets, no. 9

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne

She is all states, and all princes, I, Nothing else is.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Sun Rising, st 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on church and nobility

And when a whirl-winde hath blowne the dust of the Churchyard into the Church, and man sweeps out the dust of the Church into the Church-yard, who will undertake to sift those dusts again, and to pronounce, This is the Patrician, this is the noble flower, and this the yeomanly, this the Plebian bran.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Sermons, 1619

Contributed by: Zaady

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