John Donne

1572 - 1631

A Quote by John Donne on day, death, and life

Our critical day is not the very day of our death, but the whole course of our life; I thank him, that prays for me when my bell tolls; but I thank him much more, that catechizes me, or preaches to me, or instructs me how to live.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne

Take heed of loving me.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Prohibition, st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on control, heaven, mystery, questions, and soul

Who ever comes to shroud me, do not harm Nor question much That subtle wreath of hair, which crowns my arm; The mystery, the sign you must not touch, For 'tis my outward soul, Viceroy to that, which then to heaven being gone, Will leave this to control, And keep these limbs, her provinces, from dissolution.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Funeral, st. 1

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A Quote by John Donne on death, envy, and immortality

If poisonous minerals, and if that tree, Whose fruit threw death on else immortal us, If lecherous goats, if serpents envious Cannot be damned; alas; why should I be?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Holy Sonnets, no. 9

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A Quote by John Donne

She is all states, and all princes, I, Nothing else is.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Sun Rising, st 1

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A Quote by John Donne on church and nobility

And when a whirl-winde hath blowne the dust of the Churchyard into the Church, and man sweeps out the dust of the Church into the Church-yard, who will undertake to sift those dusts again, and to pronounce, This is the Patrician, this is the noble flower, and this the yeomanly, this the Plebian bran.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Sermons, 1619

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A Quote by John Donne on art, chance, charm, fate, men, slavery, sleep, and war

Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men, And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell, And poppy, or charms, can make us sleep as well, And better than thy stroke. Why swell'st thou then?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Holy Sonnets, No. 10

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A Quote by John Donne

Yesternight the sun went hence, And yet is here today.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Song (Sweetest Love, I Do Not Go) st. 2

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A Quote by John Donne on death, hope, love, and world

Sweetest love, I do not go, For weariness of thee, Nor in hope the world can show A fitter love for me; But since that I Must die at last, 'tis best, To use my self in jest Thus by feign'd deaths to die.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Song (Sweetest Love, I Do Not Go) st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne

The flea, though he kill none, he does all the harm he can.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Devotions upon Emergent Occasions, 1624, no. 12

Contributed by: Zaady

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