John Adams

1735 - 1826

A Quote by John Adams on america, congress, decisions, difficulty, enemies, life, nations, people, rebellion, revolution, struggle, time, and trouble

You say that at the time of the Congress, in 1765, "The great mass of the people were zealous in the cause of America." "The great mass of the people" is an expression that deserves analysis. New York and Pennsylvania were so nearly divided, if their propensity was not against us, that if New England on one side and Virginia on the other had not kept them in awe, they would have joined the British. Marshall, in his life of Washington, tells us, that the southern States were nearly equally divided. Look into the Journals of Congress, and you will see how seditious, how near rebellion were several counties of New York, and how much trouble we had to compose them. The last contest, in the town of Boston, in 1775, between Whig and Tory, was decided by five against two. Upon the whole, if we allow two thirds of the people to have been with us in the revolution, is not the allowance ample? Are not two thirds of the nation now with the administration? Divided we ever have been, and ever must be. Two thirds always had and will have more difficulty to struggle with the one third than with all our foreign enemies. He referred to a Congress "held at New York, A.D. 1765, on the subject of the American stamp act" (p. 62).

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: letter to Thomas McKean, August 31, 1813.—The Works of John Adams, ed. Charles Francis Adams, vol. 10, p. 63 (1856).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on christianity, existence, judaism, legends, religion, and understanding

As I understand the Christian religion, it was, and is, a revelation. But how has it happened that millions of fables, tales, legends, have been blended with both Jewish and Christian revelation that have made them the most bloody religion that ever existed?

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: Letter to F. A. Van der Kamp, December 27, 1816.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on catholicism, company, earth, eternity, hell, men, and merit

I do not like the late resurrection of the Jesuits. . . . If ever any congregation of men could merit eternal perdition on earth, and in hell, according to these historians, though, like Pascal, true Catholics, it is this company of Loyolas.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: Letter to Jefferson, May 5, 1816. Official edition, Writings of Thomas

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on america, glory, independence, justice, presidency, and revolution

For America's second president, the most venerated document of the Revolution was just one more occasion for sour grapes: "The Declaration of Independence I always considered as a theatrical show. Jefferson ran away with all the stage effect of that . . . and all the glory of it."

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: Letter to Benjamin Rush, June 21, 1811

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on errors, government, ignorance, reason, reflection, remorse, and retirement

"Mr. Jefferson has reason to reflect upon himself. How he will get rid of his remorse in his retirement, I know not. He must know that he leaves the government infinitely worse than he found it, and that from his own error or ignorance."

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: Letter to Benjamin Rush, April 18, 1808

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on blessings, gold, heaven, honesty, men, presidency, and quotations

I Pray Heaven to bestow the best of blessing on THIS HOUSE, and on All that shall hereafter Inhabit it. May none but honest and wise men ever rule under this roof! President Franklin D. Roosevelt had this lettered in gold in the marble over the fireplace in the State Dining Room of the White House. The quotation above follows the capitalization used in the inscription.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on aristocracy, power, and presidency

You are apprehensive of monarchy; I, of aristocracy. I would therefore have given more power to the President and less to the Senate.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on america, art, communication, country, curiosity, destruction, earth, freedom, honor, information, power, readiness, sacred, service, slander, tenderness, thinking, and writing

But none of the means of information are more sacred, or have been cherished with more tenderness and care by the settlers of America, than the press. Care has been taken that the art of printing should be encouraged, and that it should be easy and cheap and safe for any person to communicate his thoughts to the public. And you, Messieurs printers, whatever the tyrants of the earth may say of your paper, have done important service to your country by your readiness and freedom in publishing the speculations of the curious. The stale, impudent insinuations of slander and sedition with which the gormandizers of power have endeavored to discredit your paper are so much the more to your honor; for the jaws of power are always opened to devour, and her arm is always stretched out, if possible, to destroy the freedom of thinking, speaking, and writing.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: Dissertation on the Canon and the Feudal Law, 1765.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on existence, expectation, influence, laws, society, and struggle

In every society where property exists there will ever be a struggle between rich and poor. Mixed in one assembly, equal laws can never be expected; they will either be made by the member to plunder the few who are rich, or by the influence to fleece the many who are poor.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: Quoted by Senator Estes Kefauver, with the remark: "A remarkable anticipation of the basic presumption of Marxism."

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on anarchy, force, god, ideas, justice, laws, sacred, society, and tyranny

The moment the idea is admitted into society that property is not as sacred as the laws of God, and there is not a force of law and public justice to protect it, anarchy and tyranny commence.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: Letter

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content