Jane Austen

1775 - 1817

A Quote by Jane Austen

"I do not want people to be agreeable, for it saves me the trouble of liking them."

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Contributed by: Joycelyn Annette

A Quote by Jane Austen

One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Contributed by: Kelsey

A Quote by Jane Austen

Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Northanger Abbey (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) (B&N Classics Trade Paper)

Contributed by: Oceana

A Quote by Jane Austen on pride and prejudice, elizabeth, and mr collins

"I do assure you, Sir, that I have no pretension whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man. I would rather be paid the compliment of being believed sincere. I thank you again and again for the honour you have done me in your proposals, but to accept them is absolutely impossible. My feelings in every respect forbid it. Can I speak plainer? Do not consider me now as an elegant female, intending to plague you, but as a rational creature, speaking the truth from her heart."

~Elizabeth rejecting Mr. Collins' proposal

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Pride and Prejudice

Contributed by: Lydia

A Quote by Jane Austen on love and admiration

"In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you."

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" by Mr. Darcy

Contributed by: Lynn

A Quote by Jane Austen on pride and prejudice

From the very beginning- from the first moment, I may almost say- of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry."

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" by Elizabeth

Contributed by: Lynn

A Quote by Jane Austen on jane austen, employment, sorrow, and relief

"There is nothing like employment, active indispensable employment, for relieving sorrow." - Jane Austen, 19th century author

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Contributed by: Moni

A Quote by Jane Austen

..there could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison, no countenances so beloved.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Persuasion (Penguin Classics)

Contributed by: Rachel

A Quote by Jane Austen

The more I see of the world, the more I am dissatisfied with it; and everyday confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Pride and Prejudice (Collectors Edition)

Contributed by: amanda

A Quote by Jane Austen on affectoiom, growth, and disobedience

... professing myself moreover convinced that the general's unjust interference, so far from being really injurious to their felicity, was perhaps rather conducive to it, by improving their knowledge of each other, and adding strength to their attachment, I leave it to be settled, by whomsoever it may concern, whether the tendency of this work be altogether to recommend parental tyranny, or reward filial disobedience.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Northanger Abbey

Contributed by: Baroque

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