Jack Lewis

1898 - 1963

A Quote by Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis on day, life, rumor, and world

This world is a great sculptor's shop. We are the statues and there is a great rumor going around the shop that some of us are some day going to come to life.

Jack Lewis (1898 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis on goodness, heaven, and thinking

Everyone there (heaven) is filled with what we should call goodness as a mirror is filled with light. But they do not call it goodness. They do not call it anything. They are not thinking of it. They are too busy looking a t the source from which it comes.

Jack Lewis (1898 - 1963)

Source: Mere Christianity

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis on future

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The Future is something which everyone reaches at the rate of sixty minutes an hour, whatever he does, whoever he is.

Jack Lewis (1898 - 1963)

Source: The Screwtape Letters, 1941, 25

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis on day, foolishness, god, joy, justice, and work

The next hour, the next moment, is as much beyond our grasp and as much in God's care, as that a hundred years away. Care for the next minute is just as foolish as care for tomorrow, or for a day in the next thousand years. In neither can we do anything, in both God is doing everything. Those claims only of tomorrow which have to be repeated today are the joy of today: the moment which coincides with work to be done, is the moment to be minded; the next is nowhere until God has made it.

Jack Lewis (1898 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis on animals, change, darkness, heart, heaven, hell, investment, love, risk, selfishness, and tragedy

There is no safe investment. To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly be broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give your heart to no one, not even to an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements; lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket-safe, dark, motionless, airless-it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. The alternative to tragedy, or at least the risk of tragedy, is damnation. The only place outside of Heaven where you can be perfectly safe from all the dangers and perturbations of love is Hell.

Jack Lewis (1898 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis on driving and writing

I sometimes think that writing is like driving sheep down a road. If there is any gate to the left or right, the readers will most certainly go into it.

Jack Lewis (1898 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis on character, company, friendship, gifts, good, holidays, kindness, laughter, love, and talent

As all his friends will bear witness, he was a man with an outstanding gift for pastime with good company, for laughter and the love of friends - a gift which found full scope in any number of holidays and walking tours, the joyous character of his response to these being well conveyed in his letters. He had, indeed, a remarkable talent for friendship, particularly for friendship of an uproarious kind, and argumentative but never quarrelsome.

Jack Lewis (1898 - 1963)

Source: Description of C.S. Lewis the Friend by His Brother, Dr. Warren H. Lewis, December 1919:

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis on laughter, meetings, nonsense, and wit

Sometimes, though not often [in meetings of the Inklings], it would happen that no one had anything to read to us. On these occasions the fun would be riotous, with Jack at the top of his form and enjoying every minute - 'no sound delights me more', he once said, 'than male laughter'. At the Inklings his talk was an outpouring of wit, nonsense, whimsy, dialectical swordplay, and pungent judgement such as I have rarely heard equalled - no mere show put on for the occasion, either, since it was often quite as brilliant when he and I were alone together. . . . In his Preface to Essays Presented to Charles Williams, Jack gave a lively and moving account of what this circle meant to him.

Jack Lewis (1898 - 1963)

Source: Letters of C.S. Lewis, ed. with a memoir by W. H. Lewis, NY/London, HarcourtBraceJovanovich,1966

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis on ability, education, exercise, family, friendship, god, government, liberty, love, security, talent, and worship

The chief end of man, as I see it, is to find security, have liberty to express his abilities, enjoy the love of family and friends, and to secure recognition of his talents, to worship God in his own way, and to participate in a government that will protect him in his exercise of these liberties, and by education and training in the development of the arts and sciences, and the techniques of their application, help him to find his proper place in the scheme of things.

Jack Lewis (1898 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis on birth, conformity, death, devil, direction, discipline, doubt, goals, gold, good, knowledge, love, magic, men, performance, power, practice, problems, reality, repentance, science, solution, soul, spirit, truth, v

There is something which unites magic and applied science while separating both from the 'wisdom' of earlier ages. For the wise men of old the cardinal problem had been how to conform the soul to reality, and the solution had been knowledge, self-discipline, and virtue. for magic and applied science alike the problem is how to subdue reality to the wishes of men: the solution is a technique; and both, in the practice of this technique, are ready to do things hitherto regarded as disgusting and impious - such as digging up and mutilating the dead. If we compare the chief trumpeter of the new era (Bacon) with Marlowe's Faustus, the similarity is striking. You will read in some critics that Faustus has a thirst for knowledge. In reality he hardly mentions it. It is not truth he wants from the devils, but gold and guns and girls. In the same spirit, Bacon condemns those who value knowledge as an end in itself . . . The true object is to extend Man's power to the performance of all things possible. He rejects magic because it does not work; but his goal is that of the magician . . . No doubt those who really founded modern science were usually those whose love of truth exceeded their love of power; in every mixed movement the efficacy comes from the good elements not from the bad. But the presence of bad elements in not irrelevant to the direction the efficacy takes. It might be going too far to say that the modern scientific movement was tainted from its birth; but I think it would be true to say that it was born in an unhealthy neighborhood and at an inauspicious hour. Its triumphs may have been too rapid and purchased at too high a price: reconsideration, and something like repentance, may be required.

Jack Lewis (1898 - 1963)

Source: Lewis, C.S. The Abolition of Man, Collins, Fount Paperback, 1978, p. 46.

Contributed by: Zaady

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