Ibn al-'Arabi

1165 - 1240

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on determination, divinity, god, imagination, names, and rest

All {the divine Names} refer to one and the same Named One. But each one of them refers to an essential determination, different from all the rest; it is by this individualization that each Name refers to the God who reveals himself to and by the theophanic imagination.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 192

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, ethics, faith, god, knowledge, logic, love, passion, relationships, and service

. . . Ibn 'Arabi distinguishes between Allah as God in general and Rabb as the particular Lord, personalized in an individualized and undivided relation with his vassal of love. This individualized relationship on both sides is the foundation of the mystic and chivalric ethic of the fedel d'amore in the service of the personal Lord whose divinity depends on the adoration of his faithful vassal. . . . {It is the passion that the fedele d'amore feels for his Lord which reveals the Lord to Himself.} And this always individually, in an "alone to alone," which is something very different from universal logic or from a collective participation, because only the knowledge which the fedele has of his Lord is the knowledge which this personal Lord has of him.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 94

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, investment, and names

. . . in Ibn 'Arabi's own terminology Al-Lah is the Name which designates the divine Essence qualified and invested with the sum of His attributes, whereas al-Rabb, the Lord, is the personified and particularized Divine in one of its attributes (hence the divine Names designated as so many "lords", arbab).

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 122

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, faith, names, and sympathy

Paraphrased: The devotee who is faithful to the divine Name that is His Lord recognizes his Beloved in every Beloved and in every divine Name the totality of Names, because among the divine Names there is a sympathetic union.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 134

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on departure, dreams, eternity, facts, god, imagination, perception, reason, understanding, and universe

Questioner: How do you know God? Abu Asa'id al-Kharraz: By the fact that He is the coincidentia oppositorum. Corbin's commentary: . . . the entire universe of worlds is at once He and not-He (huwa la huwa). The God manifested in forms is at once Himself and other than Himself, for since He is manifested, He is the limited which has no limit, the visible which cannot be seen. This manifestation is neither perceptible nor verifiable by the sensory faculties; discursive reason rejects it. It is perceptible only by the Active Imagination (Hadrat al-Khayal...) at times when it dominates man's sense perceptions, in dreams or better still in the waking state (in the state characteristic of the gnostic when he departs from the consciousness of sensuous things). In short, a mystic perception (dhawq) is required. To perceive all forms as epiphanic forms (mazahir), that is, to perceive through the figures which they manifest and which are the eternal hexeities, that they are other than the Creator and nevertheless that they are He, is precisely to effect the encounter, the coincidence, between God's descent toward the creature and the creature's ascent toward the Creator. The "place" of this encounter is not outside the Creator-Creature totality, but is the area within it which corresponds specifically to the Active Imagination, in the manner of a bridge joining the two banks of a river. The crossing itself is essentially a hermeneutics of symbols, a method of understanding which transmutes sensory data and rational concepts into symbols (mazahir) by making them effect this crossing.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 188-189

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on action, egotism, reflection, and secrets

The Beloved becomes a mirror reflecting the secret face of the mystic lover, while the lover, purified of the opacity of his ego, becomes in turn a mirror of the attributes and actions of the Beloved.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 71

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, heart, mystery, and spirituality

The mystic Ka'aba is the heart of being. It has been said to him: "The Temple which contains Me is in your heart." The mystery of the Divine Essence is no other than the Temple of the heart, and it is around the heart that the spiritual pilgrim circumambulates.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. pp. 279-280

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, eternity, god, perception, universe, and world

Everything we call other than God, everything we call the universe, is related to the Divine Being as the shadow to the person. The world is God's shadow. . . . The shadow is at once God and something other than God. Everything we perceive is the Divine Being in the eternal hexeities of the possibles.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 191

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on creation

His creation springs, not from nothingness, from something other than Himself, from a not-Him, but from His fundamental being, from the potencies and virtualities latent in His own unrevealed being.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 185

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on compassion and world

. . . the "Sigh of Compassion" flows through the things of the world like the waters of a river and is unceasingly renewed.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 201

Contributed by: Zaady

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