Frederic William Farrar

1831 - 1903

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on cruelty, desires, husbands, imagination, journeys, necessity, suspicion, taxes, uncertainty, and women

It appears to be uncertain whether the journey of Mary with her husband was obligatory or voluntary. . . . Women were liable to a capitation tax, if this enrolment also involved taxation. But, apart from any legal necessity, it may easily be imagined that at such a moment Mary would desire not to be left alone. The cruel suspicion of which she had been the subject, and which had almost led to the breaking off of her betrothal (Matt. 1: 19) would make her cling all the more to the protection of her husband.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, footnote p 24

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on accuracy, certainty, difficulty, elderly, fatherhood, history, independence, judaism, labor, names, patience, and traditions

It is now almost certain that the genealogies in both Gospels are genealogies of Joseph, which if we may rely on early traditions of their consanguinity involve genealogies of Mary also. The Davidic descent of Mary is implied in Acts 2:30; 13:23; Rom. 1:3; Luke 1:32, etc. St. Matthew gives the legal descent of Joseph through the elder and regal line, as heir to the throne of David; St. Luke gives the natural descent. Thus, the real father of Salathiel was heir of the house of Nathan, but the childless Jeconiah (Jer. 22:30) was the last lineal representative of the elder kingly line. The omission of some obscure names and the symmetrical arrangement into tesseradecads were common Jewish customs. It is not too much to say that after the labors of Mill (on the Mythical Interpretation of the Gospels, pp. 147-217) and Lord A. C. Hervey (on the Genealogies of our Lord, 1853) scarcely a single difficulty remains in reconciling the apparent divergencies. And thus in this as in so many other instances, the very discrepancies which appear to be most irreconcilable, and most fatal to the historic accuracy of the four evangelists, turn out, on closer and more patient investigation, to be fresh proofs that they are not only entirely independent, but also entirely trustworthy.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, footnote p 27

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on failure, forgiveness, mercy, prayer, truth, and wisdom

And now I send these pages forth, not knowing what shall befall them, but with the earnest prayer that they may be blessed to aid the cause of truth and righteousness, and that He in whose name they are written may, of His mercy, "Forgive them where they fail in truth, And in His wisdom make me wise."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: final paragraph of the Preface of Life of Christ

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on anger, christ, faith, life, love, peace, persecution, philosophy, prayer, and secrets

The following sentiments are illustrative of the philosophy of the Talmud: "Love peace and pursue it at any cost." ... "Remember it is better to be persecuted than to persecute." ... "Be not prone to anger." ... "He who giveth alms in secret is greater than Moses himself." ... "It is better to utter a short prayer with devotion than a long one without fervor." ... "He who having but one piece of bread in his basket, and says, What shall I eat tomorrow? is a man of little faith." (Farrar, The Life of Christ, p. 680.)

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.680

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on failure and life

There is only one real failure in life that is possible, and that is, not to be true to the best one knows.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on acting, justice, money, nations, and prayer

Touching the matter of the defilement to which the temple courts had been subjected by traffickers acting under priestly license, Farrar gives us the following: "And this was the entrance-court to the Temple of the Most High! The court which was a witness that that house should be a House of Prayer for all nations had been degraded into a place which, for foulness, was more like shambles, and for bustling commerce more like a densely crowded bazaar; while the lowing of oxen, the bleating of sheep, the Babel of many languages, the huckstering and wrangling, and the clinking of money and of balances (perhaps not always just), might be heard in the adjoining courts, disturbing the chant of the Levites and the prayers of priests!"

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.152, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.8, p.108

Contributed by: Zaady

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