Francis Bacon

1561 - 1626

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on business, garden, history, memory, men, mind, philosophy, power, science, and understanding

The men of experiment are like the ant, they only collect and use; the reasoners resemble spiders, who make cobwebs out of their own substance. But the bee takes the middle course: it gathers its material from the flowers of the garden and field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own. Not unlike this is the true business of philosophy (science); for it neither relies solely or chiefly on the powers of the mind, nor does it take the matter which it gathers from natural history and mechanical experiments and lay up in the memory whole, as it finds it, but lays it up in the understanding altered and digested. Therefore, from a closer and purer league between these two faculties, the experimental and the rational (such as has never been made), much may be hoped.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Francis Bacon, Novum Organum, Liberal Arts Press, Inc., NY, p 93.

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A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on choice, confusion, force, learning, men, understanding, vulgarity, and words

It is by discourse that men associate; and words are imposed according to the apprehension of the vulgar. And therefore the ill and unfit choice of words wonderfully obsesses the understanding. Nor do the definitions or explanations, wherewith in some things learned men are wont to guard and defend themselves, by any means set the matter right. But words plainly force and overrule the understanding, and throw all into confusion, and lead men away into innumerable and inane controversies and fancies.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

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A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on men

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Look to make your course regular, that men may know beforehand what they may expect.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

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A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on pleasure and truth

No pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage ground of Truth.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

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A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on speech

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It is generally better to deal by speech than by letter.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Essays. Of Negotiating

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A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on ability

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Studies serve for delight, for ornaments, and for ability.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

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A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on study

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I would live to study, not study to live.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Memorial of Access

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A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on nature, senses, and understanding

The subtlety of nature is greater many times over than the subtlety of the senses and understanding.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

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A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on suffering

Dolendi modus, timendi non item.  (To suffering there is a limit; to fearing, none.)

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Of Seditions and Troubles

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A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on commitment, memory, men, observation, and superstition

The general root of superstition is that men observe when things hit, and not when they miss; and commit to memory the one, and pass over the other.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

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