Arthur Schopenhauer

1788 - 1860

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer on universe, single dreamer, and dream

The Universe is a dream dreamed by a single dreamer where all the dream characters dream too.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Contributed by: mimi

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer on happiness

What a man is contributes much more to his happiness than what he has, or how he is regarded by others.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Source: Web

Contributed by: Alex

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer on true self

The intellectual attainments of a man who thinks for himself resemble a fine painting, where the light and shade are correct, the tone sustained, the colour perfectly hamonized; it is true to life.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Source: 1000 Beautiful Things

Contributed by: Kendra

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer

"Compassion is the basis of all morality"

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Source: (German Philosopher, 1788-1860)

Contributed by: Holly

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer on talent, genius, and ability

Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer on argument, deluding, ad auditores, and debate

This is chiefly practicable in a dispute between scholars in the presence of the unlearned. If you have no argument ad rem, and none either ad hominem, you can make one ad auditores; that is to say, you can start some invalid objection, which, however, only an expert sees to be invalid. Now your opponent is an expert, but those who form your audience are not, and accordingly in their eyes he is defeated; particularly if the objection which you make places him in any ridiculous light. People are ready to laugh, and you have the laughers on your side. To show that your objection is an idle one, would require a long explanation on the part of your opponent, and a reference to the principles of the branch of knowledge in question, or to the elements of the matter which you are discussing; and people are not disposed to listen to it. For example, your opponent states that in the original formation of a mountain-range the granite and other elements in its composition were, by reason of their high temperature, in a fluid or molten state; that the temperature must have amounted to some 480 degrees Fahrenheit; and that when the mass took shape it was covered by the sea. You reply, by an argument ad auditores, that at that temperature - nay, indeed, long before it had been reached, namely, at 212 degrees Fahrenheit - the sea would have been boiled away, and spread through the air in the form of steam. At this the audience laughs. To refute the objection, your opponent would have to show that the boiling-point depends not only on the degree of warmth, but also on the atmospheric pressure; and that as soon as about half the sea-water had gone off in the shape of steam, this pressure would be so greatly increased that the rest of it would fail to boil even at a temperature of 480 degrees. He is debarred from giving this explanation, as it would require a treatise to demonstrate the matter to those who had no acquaintance with physics.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Source: http://coolhaus.de/art-of-controversy/erist28.htm

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer on death, individuality, schopenhauer, and all and nothing

As an individual, with your death there will be an end of you. But your individuality is not your true and final being, indeed it is rather the mere expression of it; it is not the thing-in-itself but only the phenomenon presented in the form of time, and accordingly has both a beginning and an end. Your being in itself, on the contrary, knows neither time, nor beginning, nor end, nor the limits of a given individuality; hence no individuality can be without it, but it is there in each and all. So that, in the first sense, after death you become nothing; in the second, you are and remain everything. That is why I said that after death you would be all and nothing.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Contributed by: J.K.

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer

Nothing in life gives a man so much courage as the attainment or renewal of the
conviction that other people regard him with favor; because it means that
everyone joins to give him help and protection, which is an infinitely stronger
bulwark against the ills of life than anything he can do himself.

  - Arthur Schopenhauer, " Position, IV "

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Source: Quoteland.com

Contributed by: Elizabeth

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer

Every man takes the limits of his own field of vision for the limits of the world.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Contributed by: The Grand Abbot

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer

It is difficult to find happiness in oneself; it is impossible to fing it anywhere else.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Contributed by: Raam

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