Alexander Hamilton

c.1756 - 1804

A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on destruction, men, profit, and war

There can be no profit in the making or selling of things to be destroyed in war. Men may think that they have such profit, but in the end the profit will turn out to be a loss.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

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A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on character, government, presidency, and wishes

That this gentleman [President John Adams] ought not to be the object of the federal wish, is, with me, reduced to demonstration. His administration has already very materially disgraced and sunk the government. There are defects in his character which must inevitably continue to do this more and more. And if he is supported by the federal party, his party must in the issue fall with him.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

Source: Letter to Charles Carroll, July 1, 1800

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A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on character, debate, democracy, direction, experience, fatherhood, good, government, honor, observation, people, politics, preparation, purity, and tyranny

The Founding Fathers were careful to distinguish representative republicanism from direct democracy. Alexander Hamilton, for example, endorsed the former but condemned the latter. . . .the records of the ratification conventions were not verbatim transcriptions. It has been observed, by an honorable gentleman, that a pure democracy, if it were practicable, would be the most perfect government. Experience has proved that no position in politics is more false than this. The ancient democracies, in which the people themselves deliberated, never possessed one feature of good government. Their very character was tyranny; their figure, deformity. When they assembled, the field of debate presented an ungovernable mob, not only incapable of deliberation, but prepared for every enormity.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

Source: at the New York convention for constitutional ratification, June 21, 1788

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A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on character, politics, and tranquility

To model our political system upon speculations of lasting tranquility, is to calculate on the weaker springs of the human character.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

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A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on army, body, circumstances, citizenship, discipline, government, inferiority, people, and time

. . . if circumstances should at any time oblige the government to form an army of any magnitude, that army can never be formidable to the liberties of the people, while there is a large body of citizens little if at all inferior to them in discipline and the use of arms, who stand ready to defend their own rights and those of their fellow citizens.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

Source: The Federalist No. 29, 1788

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A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on authority and constitution

If the end be clearly comprehended within any of the specified powers, and if the measure have an obvious relation to that end, and is not forbidden by any particular provision of the Constitution, it may safely be deemed to come within the compass of the national authority.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

Source: Opinion on the Constitutionality of the Bank [February 23, I79I]

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A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on blessings and debt

A national debt, if it is not excessive, will be to us a national blessing.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

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A Quote by Alexander Hamilton

Those who stand for nothing fall for anything.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

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A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on character, democracy, enemies, fanaticism, hypocrisy, past, politics, popularity, principles, success, and truth

Perhaps myself the first, at some expense of popularity, to unfold the true character of Jefferson, it is too late for me to become his apologist. Nor can I have any disposition to do it. I admit that his politics are tinctured with fanaticism, that he is too much in earnest in his democracy, that he has been a mischievous enemy to the principle measures of our past administration, that he is crafty & persevering in his objects, that he is not scrupulous about the means of success, nor very mindful of truth, and that he is a contemptible hypocrite.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

Source: Letter to James A. Bayard, January 16, 1801

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A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on good

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Real firmness is good for anything; strut is good for nothing.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

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