A.E. Housman

1859 - 1936

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on gold

in

Oh tarnish late on Wenlock Edge, Gold that I never see.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: A Shropshire Lad, 1896, no. 39, st. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on church, good, and people

The bells they sound on Bredon, And still the steeples hum. "Come all to church, good people"- Oh, noisy bells, be dumb; I hear you, I will come.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: A Shropshire Lad, 1896, no. 21, st. 7

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman

In all the endless road you tread There's nothing but the night.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: A Shropshire Lad, 1896, no. 60

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on heart

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When I was one-and-twenty I heard him say again, "The heart out of the bosom Was never given in vain; 'Tis Paid with sighs aplenty And sold for endless rue. And I am two-and-twenty, And Oh, 'tis true, 'tis true."

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: A Shropshire Lad, 1896, no. 13, st. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on luck and strength

Strapped, noosed, nighing his hour, He stood and counted them and cursed his luck; And then the clock collected in the tower Its strength, and struck.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: Last Poems, 1922, I5 (Eight O'Clock), st. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on god

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What God abandoned, these defended.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: Last Poems, 1922, 37, st. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on men

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But men at whiles are sober And think by fits and starts. And if they think, they fasten Their hands upon their hearts

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: Last Poems, 1922, 10, st. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on soul

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There, by the starlit fences The wanderer halts and hears My soul that lingers sighing About the glimmering weirs.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: A Shropshire Lad, 1896, no. 52, st. 4

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman

Far in a western brookland That bred me long ago The poplars stand and tremble By Pools I used to know.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: A Shropshire Lad, 1896, no. 52, st. I

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on experience, memory, and poetry

Experience has taught me, when I am shaving of a morning, to keep watch over my thoughts, because, if a line of poetry strays into my memory, my skin bristles so that the razor ceases to act. . . . The seat of this sensation is the pit of the stomach.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: The Name and Nature of Poetry

Contributed by: Zaady

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