Wyoming

Should Radio-Collared Animals Be Legally Protected?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | January 21st, 2013 | 14 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: animals, bear, bears, biologists, buffer zones, deer, Eco Travel, elk, environment, GPS, gray wolves, hunters, hunting, legal protection, Minnesota, Montana, nature, New York Times, park boundaries, predators, radio collaring, radio collars, radio telemetry, research data, scientists, Shoshone National Forest, travel, wild animals, wildlife, wolf, Wolf 754, wolves, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park

Single wolf

Despite your stance on the ethics of radio-collaring wild animals, it can’t be denied that such endeavors provide scientists with reams of valuable data, such as information on where and how animals move and migrate, the nuisance activity they engage in, their reproduction and mortality rates, and how to establish wise management practices regarding them.

That’s why when a collared research animal is lost, it’s not just a detriment to that animal’s social group or species but to our understanding of nature, as well.

Usually, the death of a collared animal goes unnoticed, except within a few scientific circles. But when Wolf No. 754, a popular Yellowstone National Park research animal, was recently shot by a hunter in Wyoming’s Shoshone National Forest, a few miles outside the national park boundary, reverberations and outrage were felt around the world.

It’s causing some to ask: Should research animals be given full, legal protection?

Searching for the Sound of Silence: Earth’s Vanishing Quiet Places

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | October 22nd, 2010 | 3 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Cirque of the Towers, civilization, encroachment, Gordon Hempton, National Park Service, nature, noise pollution, overpopulation, quiet, silence, silent, sound, travel, wilderness, Wind River Range, Wyoming

Cirque of the Towers

In this two-part blog series, Wendy Worrall Redal explores our vanishing quiet places and what that loss could mean for us.

Are Animals Taking the Blame for Our Bad Behavior?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | September 27th, 2010 | 6 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: animals, Bryce Canyon National Park, buffalo, camping, Coyote, Eco Travel, environment, Glacier National Park, grizzly bears, hiking, hoodoos, Idaho, Katmai National Park, Montana, national parks, nature, Paiutes, wildlife, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park

There are many Native American stories regarding the stunning red, orange and white hoodoos in Utah’s Bryce Canyon National Park. The Paiute Indians call the park Unka-timpe-wa-wince-pockich — which means “red rocks standing like men in a bowl-shaped canyon.” According to one of their myths, a long time ago a group of people moved into the area and made Coyote angry with their bad behavior. Coyote put a curse on the people, turning them to stone. The canyon’s hoodoos are these Legend People.