wholeness

The Ethics of Teaching Yoga

Gaiam Staff by Gaiam Staff | February 18th, 2013 | No Comments
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: adhering to a high standard of ethics, Big Happy Day, blogging, chiropractor, class safety, confidentiality, Darren Main, doctor, ethical standards, ethics, ethics to live by, GaiamTV, harmful ethics, healing, hippy, industry ethics, lift up the profession, massage therapist, niyamas, off the mat, on the mat, professionalism, safe space, speak honestly, spirituality, students, wholeness, yamas, yoga teacher, yoga teacher ethics

Yogi Darren Main asks yoga teachers to reflect on the ethics of being a yoga teacher. Main views ethics as a foundational necessity for any yoga teacher so that they can create a safe space for students to flourish and grow. He believes teachers must root themselves in the Yamas and the Niyamas in order to be a good example for students both on and off the mat.

Is Oneness Really the Right Path?

Kaedrich Olsen by Kaedrich Olsen | December 11th, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: accept who you are, acceptance, Akashic records, Atman, Brahman, change, consciousness, ego, greater whole, Hermetic Maxim, higher reality, illusory existence, individuality, loss of individual, maya, oneness, rejecting ego, removing ego, sacred being, spiritual, state of flux, transformation, universal consciousness, universal spirit, universe, wholeness, you are perfect, Zen

Oneness

Many Eastern and modern spiritual traditions claim that oneness is the pinnacle of spiritual achievement. In this sense, oneness means to connect to — and ultimately become absorbed into — a great numinous matrix. This can be likened to a drop of water returning to the ocean, as Zen traditions claim.

However, oneness can also be realized as the loss of individuality when memories and experiences become information within the Akashic records. In all of these cases, the individual that once was a human being no longer exists upon the death of the body. The essence of one’s experience and being is simply absorbed into the fold of a higher level of reality, or into a greater whole.

In the classical sense of oneness, each individual is advised to reject or remove the ego. This enables an easier assimilation into the great numinous state of oneness. This results in the loss of who you are, and all that you have gained, as an individual. However, this is not the only option open to us. We can retain our individuality and still become part of a greater whole.