wheat

Recipe: Cinnamon Amaranth Porridge

Pooja Mottl by Pooja Mottl | April 17th, 2013 | 2 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: amaranth, Atecs, banana, beans, cashews, cinnamon, coconut sugar, digestions, fermenting grains, gluten-free, grain consumption, honey, Incas, maize, maple syrup, millet, nature, nourishing traditions, nuts, oats, phytic acics, pseudocereal, pseudograin, quinoa, refined flour, rice, sally fallon, sea salt, seeds, soaking grains, sprouting grains, wheat, whole grains

Cinnamon Amaranth Porridge

Did you know that nearly 75 percent of the average American’s grain consumption is wheat? And that the vast majority of this is consumed as refined flour? In fact, we only consume, on average, a pitiful 10 percent of grains in the form of whole grains. Ten percent! And of this minute portion, wheat, rice and oats take top billing.

Luckily, this recipe helps us discover one of Mother Nature’s most delightful, yet most overlooked varieties of whole grain on Earth: amaranth. Amaranth was cultivated by the Incas and Aztecs and was considered one of their staple foods along with maize and beans. Like quinoa and millet, amaranth is considered a pseudograin/pseudocereal, as these foods derive from broad-leaf plants instead of grasses (e.g. corn, wheat). However, their seeds are used in much the same way.

So why choose amaranth over a more-familiar grain? Because this underdog of a plant boasts some fantastic qualities: It’s easy to cook, gluten-free, and relatively inexpensive.

How Yoga Made Me an Enlightened Eater

Kathryn Budig by Kathryn Budig | April 13th, 2011 | 10 Comments
topic: Detox, Fitness, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Yoga | tags: 21-day Standard Process cleanse, acupuncture, alcohol, ayurveda, caffeine, change, dairy, detox, diet, farmers market, fermented foods, flour, food, grocery store, health, healthy-eating, homeopathy, journey, junk food, Kathryn Budig, lifestyle, nuts, organic, processed food, raw food, smoothie, sugar, supplements, wheat, whole food, Yoga

Yoga DietI love food and I’m pretty sure it’s got a thing for me too.

I grew up in Kansas where cheese came in the form of a thin orange square wrapped in plastic. Dinner often came out of a box and I thought Miracle Whip and mayonnaise were the same thing. I lived blissfully unaware as I continued into my college years thinking the vegetable garden blend of cream cheese was healthy because it contained vegetables. You can’t fault a Kansas girl for trying.

It wasn’t until I started a full-time yoga practice that I started to change my ways. The interesting part was that no one pushed their yogic eating principles on me. It was simple — the more I practiced, the more my desire for good, healthy fuel grew.