Washington State

Should U.S. Military Ranges Double as Wildlife Refuges?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | September 27th, 2013 | 4 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Army’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord, California, desert tortoises, endangered-species, environment, extinction, forests, Fort Irwin, island night lizard, killer whale, marine mammals, military, military ranges, National Marine Fisheries Service, national park, nature, NatureServe, navy sonar, orca, Oregon, Pentagon, prairies, Puerto Rico, San Clemente Island, San Clemente Island lizard, San Clemente Island loggerhead shrike, threatened species, travel, U.S. Defense Department, U.S. Forest Service, Vieques, Washington State, western snowy plovers, wetland restoration, wildlife, wildlife refuges

Orca in Washington State

When you think of endangered species in this country, struggling to survive in their native habitats, you probably picture them on national park or U.S. Forest Service lands. But according to NatureServe, a nonprofit conservation organization that tracks wildlife, U.S. Defense Department properties have the highest density of threatened and endangered species of any federal land management agency. The Pentagon states that on average, military lands boast 15 threatened and endangered species per acre — nearly seven times more per acre than on U.S. Forest Service tracts.

Our nation’s military lands, however, are first and foremost dedicated to preparing for armed readiness, meaning that military exercises, such as target practice, are routine. Is this the kind of environment in which we want threatened species to play out their last-ditch efforts for survival?

Should the Wealthy Buy Wild Lands to Save Them?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | October 13th, 2011 | 45 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Canada lynx, conservation, Douglas Tompkins, Eco Travel, environment, environmental protection, environmentalism, environmentalist, French Polynesia, Marlon Brando, national parks, nature, parks, Paul Allen, preservation, private islands, Pumalin Park, Richard Bailey, Tetiaroa, Washington State, wild places, wildlife

Patagonia

When one of America’s best-known and finest actors, Marlon Brando, bought his own private island in 1966, people generally wrote the news off as just another eccentric act by the rich. Until his death in July 2004 at the age of 80, Brando “owned” Tetiaroa, a 2.5-square-mile atoll in the South Pacific, 37 miles north of Tahiti. (He obtained a 99-year lease to it from the French Polynesian government.)

Brando was a nature purist and hoped Tetiaroa would be part environmental laboratory — mostly for sea turtles — and part modest eco-resort. In a will he signed in 1982, he put Tetiaroa in a trust so it could be preserved for posterity. “If I have my way,” he once wrote in a memoir, “Tetiaroa will remain forever a place that reminds Tahitians of who they are and what they were centuries ago.” His wish was to keep the island from becoming overly developed and in as natural a state as possible.