time out

Short on Time? Try This All-in-One Yoga Pose!

Jill Miller by Jill Miller | September 21st, 2011 | 22 Comments
topic: Fitness, Yoga | tags: alignment, benefits of yoga, Jill Miller, Leg Stretch #3, strength, stress, stretches, time out, Yoga, yoga block, yoga poses, Yoga Tune Up®

All-In-One Yoga Pose: Leg Stretch #3

I have been teaching yoga for 17 years, and one of the most frequent complaints I hear from students and yogaphobes alike is that they don’t have enough time for practice, so they avoid it altogether.

Avoiding a regular practice of stretching will never get you the healing benefits that come with the work. Even if you only do one pose a day, you will make a huge difference in your body, brain and well-being.

Time Out!

Cynthia James by Cynthia James | February 25th, 2011 | 1 Comment
topic: Personal Growth | tags: affirmation, body, break, care, diet, fatigue, food, healthy-eating, life, me time, mediation, meditation, mental clarity, pushing the envelope, pushing the limit, recharge, recover, recovery period, rejuvenate, rejuvenation, relaxation, rest, retreat, self, self care, sick, soul, spirit, testing boundaries, time out, transformation

Take time out to rechargeI was recently around a parent who was teaching their child discipline. When the child would become disruptive and disobedient, the parent would say, “Do you want a time out?” If the child continued, the parent would say, “All right, if you keep this up, you will take a time out.” The child continued and the parent said, “Okay, that’s it! Time out!” They then made the child sit in a place that they were not allowed to get out of until the parent gave permission. Of course, the child was upset even though they were clearly testing the boundaries.

Take Time Out to Contemplate

Cynthia James by Cynthia James | September 24th, 2009 | 2 Comments
topic: Personal Growth | tags: affirmation, change, contemplation, intention, spiritual practice, starting over, stillness, time out, transformation

When my children were small, I would give them “time outs” to contemplate their behavior after a challenging experience. The intention was to support them in having time to gain clarity on the consequences of their actions. It didn’t always work, but it did support all of us in stopping for a short time to gain composure.