Tigers

Is Another Mass Extinction Imminent?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | September 27th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Green Living | tags: Anthony Barnosky, biodiversity, birds, climate change, conservation, conservation efforts, die-off, Eco Travel, endangered, endangered animals, endangered-species, environment, extinction, frogs, global-warming, habitat fragmentation, International Union for Conservation of Nature, invasive species, IUCN Red List, loss of habitat, nature, science, scientists, species extinction, Tigers, travel

Pronghorn in Yellowstone National Park

We could be on the brink of a mass extinction — the Earth’s sixth — according to a paper published last year in the journal Nature. First author Anthony Barnosky, an integrative biologist at the University of California at Berkeley, says Earth has experienced five mass extinctions during the past 540 million years, and another extinction could be around the corner. During each of the five previous events, three-quarters or more of the world’s animal species died out. One of the mass extinctions — which occurred 65 million years ago — ended the dinosaurs.

Some say, however, that this isn’t much cause for alarm. Species have always come and gone over long periods of time; and given the five mass extinctions we’ve already had, it’s a natural event. But will this sixth one be a “different animal”? 

Are the Dubai Penguins Ambassadors of the Wild, or Agents of Profit?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | June 18th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: animal ambassadors, animals, Antarctica, big cats, birds, captive, captive wildlife, captivity, conservation, Dubai, Eco Travel, ecosystems, environment, Middle East, natural habitats, nature, penguins, pets, photography, threatened, threatened species, Tigers, travel, wild, wildlife

Penguin in Antarctica

In the hot, desert climate of Dubai on the Arabian Peninsula, 20 penguins are living in comfort, say the managers of Ski Dubai, the first indoor ski resort in the Middle East. The birds reside in a climate-controlled environment, receive the best veterinary care, and never have to worry about lurking predators.

When you visit Ski Dubai, you can pay to have a “penguin encounter,” where you’ll be able to play with and touch the penguins. Representatives of the resort say that these animals are “ambassadors,” teaching patrons about their wild counterparts and the need to conserve their threatened natural habitat, Antarctica.

But can animals that have been born and raised in captivity and habituated to humans in unnatural ways ever be true ambassadors for the natural world? Can they teach us anything about the wild or move us to care for the environments from which they are so distantly removed?

6 African Safari Eco-Camps to Take Your Breath Away

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | April 5th, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: African safari, Botswana, Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, camping, conservation, Eco Travel, ecotourism, elephants, endangered-species, Gorilla Forest Camp, Great Plains Conservation, green-travel, Himba tribe, Kalamu Star Bed Camp, Kalamu Walking Trail, Kenya, Leleshwa Camp, lions, Masai Mara game reserve, mountain gorillas, Namibia, National Geographic, natural-habitat-adventures, night sky, Sabi Sabi Earth Lodge, sea turtles, Serra Cafema, South Africa, stars, summer vacation, The Last Lions, Tigers, treehouses, Uganda, wildlife safari, Zambia, Zarafa Camp

Elephant at Zarafa Camp, Botswana

If you’re contemplating an African safari, no doubt it’s the extraordinary wildlife that’s top draw. But many safari camps and lodges are highlights in their own right. While most are not for the faint of budget, they are peerless when it comes to enhancing the “trip of a lifetime”!

As more safari operations “go green” by committing to environmental and community sustainability, the selection of alluring eco-minded camps and lodges continues to grow. Here are six that will have you online in a heartbeat to secure your deluxe tent beneath the stars — or at least daydreaming about it.

Earth Hour 2012: Will Giving 60 Minutes for the Planet Matter?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | March 2nd, 2012 | 5 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Beyond the Hour, biofuels, carbon offsets, climate change, Earth Hour, environment, environmental awareness, fluorescent light bulbs, global-warming, Green Living, interconnectedness, nature, polar-bears, sea turtles, social-media, Tigers, travel, twitter, wildlife, World Watch Institute, World Wildlife Fund

Sea turtel

To support what’s being billed as the “largest environmental event in history,” all you have to do is turn off your lights for one hour on Saturday, March 31, at 8:30 p.m., your local time. That’s it. It’s probably the easiest thing you’ve ever been asked to do for the planet and the natural world.

The request is a simple one because the World Wildlife Fund, the organizer of Earth Hour, is counting on millions of other people to do the same thing in a cascade around the globe, from New Zealand to Hawaii. And by using the power of our digital interconnectedness throughout the world, it’s hoped we’ll make a bigger statement — via social media — to those in positions of power about our concern regarding the Earth’s changing climate and the effect it’s having, especially on wildlife such as polar bears, tigers and sea turtles.

But in the end, will Earth Hour — and the 60 minutes you spend in the dark — really make a difference?

Restore or Protect: Which Environmental Choice Would You Make?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | June 10th, 2011 | 10 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: California, dams, earthquake, earthquake eco restoration, eco restoration, environment, environmental awareness, grassland restoration, Hetch Hetchy Valley, John Muir, nature, pandas, polar-bears, San Francisco, Sierra Club, Tigers, Tuolumne River, wetland restoration, Yosemite National Park

Hetch Hetchy in Yosemite

The Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park was once described by naturalist John Muir as, “A grand landscape garden, one of nature’s rarest and most precious mountain mansions.”

But in 1913, the U.S. Congress authorized the city of San Francisco to construct a dam and reservoir on the Tuolumne River in Hetch Hetchy to ensure that San Francisco would have a dependable water supply. It is said that the act broke John Muir’s heart, and some have even suggested that this great sadness hastened his death in 1914. By 1923, the dam was completed and the valley was flooded under several hundred feet of water.

Today, the Hetch Hetchy Valley, like many of America’s natural landscapes, is at the center of a restoration debate. But is trying to turn back the clock on natural areas we altered long ago the best way to spend environmental funds, especially in these cash-strapped times? Or would working to protect those wild places we still have in their original state be a better use of scant resources?

Will You Miss the Animals You Never Knew?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | April 20th, 2011 | 10 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: bonobo, chimpanzees, China, climate change, conservation, Democratic Republic of Congo, environment, extinction, frogs, giant pandas, global-warming, greenhouse gas emissions, greenhouse gases, Gulf of California, habitat destruction, International Tiger Forum, mexico, nature, polar-bears, porpoises, species extinction, Tigers, vaquitas, World Wildlife Fund, Year of the Tiger

Polar bear

About four years ago, the U.S. Geological Survey released a projection report stating that two-thirds of the world’s polar bears would be gone by 2050. Their numbers would plummet, stated the report, due to shrinking summer sea ice caused by greenhouse gases. Since that time, images of polar bears have graced water bottles, T-shirts and tote bags. It’s now widely accepted that Ursus maritimus is the poster child for climate change.

We also know of other species in great peril — mostly because of media attention to them. According to the Chinese zodiac, 2010 was the Year of the Tiger, and last November the International Tiger Forum was held in St. Petersburg in the Russian Federation. As the world’s first global summit focused on saving a single species from extinction, the event received widespread news coverage.

Because their likenesses appear on TV screens and spearhead conservation campaigns, chances are that even if you don’t live in tiger or polar bear habitats — where it would at least be possible for you to run into them during your daily life — you would miss them if they disappeared from our planet. But will you mourn the extinction of other species living today if you’ve never heard of them?

Should There Be a National Tiger Registry?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | February 16th, 2011 | 7 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: America, Asia, backyard zoos, big-game parks, black market, breeding, cages, captive, captive wildlife, captivity, Chinese zodiac, conservation, database, endangered-species, environment, exotic animals, extinction, folk remedies, Global Tiger Initiative, Global Tiger Recovery Program, harm to wildlife, hunting, illegal, International Tiger Forum, International Year of the Tiger, laws, natural habitats, natural-habitat-adventures, nature, pets big cats, population, protecting wildlife, registry, regulations, Russian Federation, St. Petersburg, states, threatened, Tigers, trade, wild, wildlife, wildlife welfare, World Wildlife Fund

Tiger

There are more tigers in captivity (such as this one) than there are left in the wild. ©John T. Andrews

There are some statistics that you hear that knock your socks off, and you just can’t quite believe them. You think they’re concocted purely to get attention and for shock value. Here’s one I recently came across that fits that category: There are more tigers in American backyards than there are left in the wild throughout the world.

How could that be?! I wondered. After all, the tiger isn’t even indigenous to the United States! It turns out that there is very little regulation on keeping wild tigers here. And because their body parts are prized in Asian black markets for traditional medicines and folk remedies — and because they are popular subjects for photographers and as college mascots — trafficking in and owning tigers becomes a means of making money.