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6 African Safari Eco-Camps to Take Your Breath Away

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | April 5th, 2012 | 4 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: African safari, Botswana, Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, camping, conservation, Eco Travel, ecotourism, elephants, endangered-species, Gorilla Forest Camp, Great Plains Conservation, green-travel, Himba tribe, Kalamu Star Bed Camp, Kalamu Walking Trail, Kenya, Leleshwa Camp, lions, Masai Mara game reserve, mountain gorillas, Namibia, National Geographic, natural-habitat-adventures, night sky, Sabi Sabi Earth Lodge, sea turtles, Serra Cafema, South Africa, stars, summer vacation, The Last Lions, Tigers, treehouses, Uganda, wildlife safari, Zambia, Zarafa Camp

Elephant at Zarafa Camp, Botswana

If you’re contemplating an African safari, no doubt it’s the extraordinary wildlife that’s top draw. But many safari camps and lodges are highlights in their own right. While most are not for the faint of budget, they are peerless when it comes to enhancing the “trip of a lifetime”!

As more safari operations “go green” by committing to environmental and community sustainability, the selection of alluring eco-minded camps and lodges continues to grow. Here are six that will have you online in a heartbeat to secure your deluxe tent beneath the stars — or at least daydreaming about it.

14 Stellar Spots to See the Stars

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | August 19th, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Eco Travel | tags: Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, archaeoastronomy, Arizona, astronomy, astrophotography, Atacama Desert, Australia, Bryce Canyon National Park, California, camping, celestial, Chaco Canyon, Chaco Culture National Historic Park, Cherry Springs State Park, Chile, conservation, Eco Travel, ecotourism, europe, Flagstaff, galaxies, Galloway Forest Park, Goldendale Observatory State Park, Green Living, Haleakala National Park, hawaii, hiking, Hungary, International Dark Sky Association, International Dark Sky Community, Lake Tekapo, light pollution, Mackinaw City, Maui, Mauna Kea, Milky Way, Mont-Megantic International Dark Sky Reserve, Mount Cook, Mount Haleakala, National Park Service, New Mexico, New Zealand, NSW, Pennsylvania, planets, protection, Quebec, Scotland, stargazing, Starlight, stars, telescope, The Headlands, trip, UK, UNESCO Starlight Reserve, United Kingdom, urban sprawl, Utah, vacation, Washington, Wiruna, Zselic Starry Sky Park

Milky Way from Atacama Desert, Chile

Ecotourism often focuses on vanishing natural resources, such as rainforests and glaciers. It’s not often, though, that we think of looking up when we ponder the fate of the natural world under threat. Yet the starry night sky is disappearing as rapidly from human experience as vast tracts of the Amazon or the Arctic ice cap.

Light pollution is growing at the rate of four percent per year, according to the International Dark Sky Association. It is so pervasive that if you were to stand on the observation deck of the Empire State Building, you would see less than one percent of the stars that Galileo Galilei saw through his telescope in 1610.

Part One of this series explored the movement to protect the earth’s natural nightscapes. Here in Part Two, you’ll find suggestions for stargazing destinations that will open up the universe to whole new realms of perception. Escape the orange glow of interstates, car dealerships and mall parking lots, and discover the wonders of our twinkling galaxy!

Dark Sky Tourism: A Growing Trend

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | August 12th, 2011 | 4 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Arizona, artificial light, astrotourism, Cloudcroft, conservation, constellations, Dark Sky Places, Dark Sky tourism, ecosystems, Flagstaff, International Dark Sky Association, International Dark Sky Community, light pollution, Milky Way, Natural Bridges National Monument, New Mexico Skies, night, night sky, nocturnal animals, sleep cycles, Starlight Reserves, stars, starscapes, the right to starlight, true darkness, UNESCO, United Nations, urban sprawl, wildlife habitats

North America light pollution

Part One of a two-part series on light pollution and dark sky conservation and tourism.

Few experiences instill more wonder than sitting outside on a summer night and looking up at the stars. Locating constellations, spying satellites and hoping for the flash of a falling meteor are pastimes sure to fill you with a sense of awe. But finding a place for serious stargazing can be a challenge. Until you’ve seen a truly dark sky, you don’t even know what you’re missing. Part One of this two-part series explores the need to protect and promote our natural starscapes. Stay tuned for Part Two, to find the best places to view the night sky.

Night Lighting: Would You Choose Safety or the Stars?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | July 20th, 2011 | 11 Comments
topic: Green Living | tags: artificial light, bats, bird migration, birds, crime statistics, dark sky, darkenss, environment, green, health, light at night, light pollution, migrating birds, migratory birds, national parks, nature, neighborhoods, night lights, night sky, night-light, nighttime, nocturnal animals, outdoor lighting, outdoors, safety, stars, street lamps, wildlife

Canada geese

The street you live on, your neighbor’s garage or even your own back porch probably has one: a light that goes on when it gets dark. Most likely, it was installed with the hope that it would make your neighborhood a safer place to live.

The conventional wisdom is that better outdoor lighting deters criminals — those who would do their dastardly deeds in the cover of darkness. But whether or not the facts bear that out, we do know that lighting up the night eradicates something else: the ability to see the stars in the night sky.