sea turtles

6 African Safari Eco-Camps to Take Your Breath Away

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | April 5th, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: African safari, Botswana, Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, camping, conservation, Eco Travel, ecotourism, elephants, endangered-species, Gorilla Forest Camp, Great Plains Conservation, green-travel, Himba tribe, Kalamu Star Bed Camp, Kalamu Walking Trail, Kenya, Leleshwa Camp, lions, Masai Mara game reserve, mountain gorillas, Namibia, National Geographic, natural-habitat-adventures, night sky, Sabi Sabi Earth Lodge, sea turtles, Serra Cafema, South Africa, stars, summer vacation, The Last Lions, Tigers, treehouses, Uganda, wildlife safari, Zambia, Zarafa Camp

Elephant at Zarafa Camp, Botswana

If you’re contemplating an African safari, no doubt it’s the extraordinary wildlife that’s top draw. But many safari camps and lodges are highlights in their own right. While most are not for the faint of budget, they are peerless when it comes to enhancing the “trip of a lifetime”!

As more safari operations “go green” by committing to environmental and community sustainability, the selection of alluring eco-minded camps and lodges continues to grow. Here are six that will have you online in a heartbeat to secure your deluxe tent beneath the stars — or at least daydreaming about it.

Earth Hour 2012: Will Giving 60 Minutes for the Planet Matter?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | March 2nd, 2012 | 5 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Beyond the Hour, biofuels, carbon offsets, climate change, Earth Hour, environment, environmental awareness, fluorescent light bulbs, global-warming, Green Living, interconnectedness, nature, polar-bears, sea turtles, social-media, Tigers, travel, twitter, wildlife, World Watch Institute, World Wildlife Fund

Sea turtel

To support what’s being billed as the “largest environmental event in history,” all you have to do is turn off your lights for one hour on Saturday, March 31, at 8:30 p.m., your local time. That’s it. It’s probably the easiest thing you’ve ever been asked to do for the planet and the natural world.

The request is a simple one because the World Wildlife Fund, the organizer of Earth Hour, is counting on millions of other people to do the same thing in a cascade around the globe, from New Zealand to Hawaii. And by using the power of our digital interconnectedness throughout the world, it’s hoped we’ll make a bigger statement — via social media — to those in positions of power about our concern regarding the Earth’s changing climate and the effect it’s having, especially on wildlife such as polar bears, tigers and sea turtles.

But in the end, will Earth Hour — and the 60 minutes you spend in the dark — really make a difference?

Travel That Gives Back: This Earth Day, Plan a Voluntourism Vacation

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | April 21st, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Giving Back, Green Living | tags: africa, agriculture, Aisa, Baja Peninsula, Belize, Bifengxia Panda Center, building projects, Cape Coast, charity, China, community development, conservation, Cotton Tree Lodge, Earth Day, elephant sanctuary, endangered-species, environmental education, environmental protection, europe, GAP Adventures, GeoVisions, Ghana, giving back, Global Volunteer Network, Go Abroad, Go Eco, gray whales, green-travel, Grupo Tortuguero, i to i Volunteer & Adventure Travel, Institute for Field Research Expeditions, International Student Volunteers, international trips, kids, Lonely Planet, Magadalena Bay, mexico, NGOs, nonprofits, Organic Chocolate Farm, Panda Conservation Adventure, ProWorld, recycling, sanitation, sea turtles, service work, Sichuan province, south america, Sri Lanka, Sustainable Harvest International, teaching, volunteer vacation, volunteering, voluntourism, VolunTourism.org, waste management, wildlife, youth

Measuring a sea turtle

As Julio hauled the net into our skiff, we spied a green sea turtle ensnared in the mesh. In this case, we were happy to see our captive: Julio is the Magadalena Baykeeper on Mexico’s Baja Peninsula, and part of his job is working with Grupo Tortuguero — the world’s foremost sea turtle conservation group — to capture, study and release endangered turtles in order to help ensure their future.