respect

4 Ways to Keep the Flame Burning Year-Round

Jessica Mehring by Jessica Mehring | February 14th, 2014 | No Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: communication, date nights, happiness, intimacy, kindness, love, marriage, respect, Valentines Day

Love isn’t the same thing as romance. Romance is one way to express love – but we can express love in so many other ways, too.

Love isn’t just a feeling. It’s not just an emotion. Love is a commitment to putting your partner at the top of your priority list. Love is intimacy at every level.

A Key to Happiness

Cynthia James by Cynthia James | December 10th, 2013 | No Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: affirmation, authenticity, celebration, desires, gift giving, giving and receiving, happinesss, happy, harmony, heart, holidays, intention, joy, key to happiness, kindness, peaceful actions, peaceful thoughts, respect, share, simple acts, simple and heartfelt gifts, soul, stressful holidays, stressful season, want to be happy, wisdom, without expectation

This is the time of year when people are often either excited to celebrate the holidays or they are feeling a sense of dread about what might be coming during this sometimes stressful season. But the one thing that we all have in common is that we want to be happy.

As I was thinking about happiness, it came to me that a key to happiness involves circulation. By that I mean that true happiness comes from giving and receiving. The kind of sharing that involves the heart and the willingness to share without any expectations.

It’s Okay to Say “Namaste”

Jill Miller by Jill Miller | August 4th, 2011 | 9 Comments
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: closure, divine, end of yoga class, greetings, honor, Jill Miller, Kundalini Yoga, love, mantras, meditation, namaste, oneness, prayer, respect, sacred, sanskrit, santa fe, the light within me, universal consciousness, Yoga, yoga instructor, yoga teacher, Yoga Tune Up®, Yoga TuneUp, yoga-practice

NamasteThe first time I took a live yoga class, at age 12 or 13, I remember hearing some strange, prayer-like, exotic word come out of my teacher’s mouth. Everyone echoed it back, and it made me uncomfortable. It didn’t stop me from going back, but I did kind of feel “left out,” as I didn’t know what they were saying, what it meant, or if it was the name of a god or other deity. Frankly, it sounded kind of religious, and I was definitely not into god-stuff at that point in my ’tweendom.

When my teacher told me what Namaste meant (“I bow to the god within you”) and how to pronounce it (Nah- Mah-Stay), it didn’t necessarily make the phrase any easier for me to embrace. But the social pressure of  “call and response” soon won me over. I attended very small classes in Santa Fe, and any non-compliant Namaste’ers would be very obvious to the teacher and other students. At first it barely rolled out of my lips, a garbled rumble of vowels with slight hiss in the middle. I had no way of knowing that a decade later, I would be the one at the front of the room offering the same salutation to my classes.