quinoa

Recipe: Quinoa Coconut Cereal + The Power of WAMP!

Pooja Mottl by Pooja Mottl | May 20th, 2014 | No Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: ancel keys, coconut, Empowering Days, gaiam, health, low carb, organic, Pooja Mottl, processed foods, quinoa, QUINOA COCONUT CEREAL, recipe, recipes, The 3-Day Reset: Restore Your Cravings for Healthy Foods in Three Easy, vegan, vegetables, wamp, Whole Foods

quinoa coconut cereal recipe

Healthy eating begins with two simple principles:

Processed Foods = Bad

Whole and Minimally Processed (WAMP) Foods = Good

The idea that eating whole foods is good and processed foods is bad may seem self-evident, but it’s not as obvious as you might think. In fact, pinpointing WAMP foods isn’t simple. Processed foods can be sneaky and disguise themselves as healthy foods without our noticing.

For example, we all know that chips, fries, and doughnuts are processed junk-type foods — that’s obvious. But what about bagels, cereal, and yogurt? Maybe not—it all depends on the ingredients that make them what they are. Most bagels are full of refined, processed wheat, and mainstream cereals are stuffed with processed sugar — they’re certainly not WAMP foods. The fact is there isn’t a standard, regulated definition of the words “whole” or “minimally processed.” You’ll need to learn what makes a food WAMP and what doesn’t because labels on packages won’t tell you.

Luckily, there are a few key attributes that flag a food as WAMP.

Recipe: Cinnamon Amaranth Porridge

Pooja Mottl by Pooja Mottl | April 17th, 2013 | 2 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: amaranth, Atecs, banana, beans, cashews, cinnamon, coconut sugar, digestions, fermenting grains, gluten-free, grain consumption, honey, Incas, maize, maple syrup, millet, nature, nourishing traditions, nuts, oats, phytic acics, pseudocereal, pseudograin, quinoa, refined flour, rice, sally fallon, sea salt, seeds, soaking grains, sprouting grains, wheat, whole grains

Cinnamon Amaranth Porridge

Did you know that nearly 75 percent of the average American’s grain consumption is wheat? And that the vast majority of this is consumed as refined flour? In fact, we only consume, on average, a pitiful 10 percent of grains in the form of whole grains. Ten percent! And of this minute portion, wheat, rice and oats take top billing.

Luckily, this recipe helps us discover one of Mother Nature’s most delightful, yet most overlooked varieties of whole grain on Earth: amaranth. Amaranth was cultivated by the Incas and Aztecs and was considered one of their staple foods along with maize and beans. Like quinoa and millet, amaranth is considered a pseudograin/pseudocereal, as these foods derive from broad-leaf plants instead of grasses (e.g. corn, wheat). However, their seeds are used in much the same way.

So why choose amaranth over a more-familiar grain? Because this underdog of a plant boasts some fantastic qualities: It’s easy to cook, gluten-free, and relatively inexpensive.

‘Social Media’ Your Way to Health and Fitness

Tamara Grand by Tamara Grand | February 7th, 2013 | 5 Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: at-home workouts, birds of a feather flock together, circle of friends, clean eating recipes, diet, engage, exercise challenge, exercise classes, exercise habits, exercise schedule, facebook, family, friends, get motivated, healthy habits, healthy living, inspirational photos, instagram, interact, low calorie recipes, meals, old friends, paleo diet, participate, personal support group, pinterest, quinoa, smartphone photos, social, social interactions, social media platforms, social networking, socially, tweet, twitter, twitter chats, urge to eat, visual cookbook, weight loss groups, YouTube

Humans are inherently social creatures. Most of us enjoy the company of others and spend much of our waking time engaging in social interactions with friends and family.

Interestingly, people who spend a lot of time together often adopt one another’s eating and exercise habits, sometimes for the better, but often for the worse. Remember the old saying ‘birds of a feather, flock together’?

But there’s a positive side to our desire to conform socially. Find the right circle of friends — your own personal support group — and sticking to an exercise schedule or diet becomes easier. Hence the popularity of organized weight-loss groups and exercise classes.

Furthermore, research demonstrates that just having a weight-loss or fitness support system in place results in better adherence to diet and exercise and more pounds shed and kept off over the long term.

Don’t have access to a local support group? Make your own via one of the following social media platforms: