pranayama

Detox Yoga Pose Sequence

Sadie Nardini by Sadie Nardini | February 6th, 2014 | 25 Comments
topic: Detox, Fitness, Health & Wellness, Yoga | tags: cleanse, core strength, meditation, power yoga, pranayama, stress-relief, vinyasa, weight-loss, Yoga, yoga for detox, yoga poses, yoga-practice

Detox Yoga

Before the holidays is a great time to detox. It can stave off weight gain and put you in a healthy mindset to help you resist temptation. And detoxing after the holiday “re-tox” — no matter how much carnage was left on that Thanksgiving dinner table, or how much stress crept into your weekend — is as easy as unrolling your mat. No matter when or on what level you could use a little realigning, this sequence is for you.

Yoga for All Seasons: Winter

Nichole Golden by Nichole Golden | December 31st, 2013 | 3 Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Yoga | tags: ayurveda, backbend, body, bow pose, Breath of Fire, circulation, cold weather, colds and flus, corpse pose, Dhanurasana, doshas, energy, Fish Pose, heat, herbs, hibernate, hibernation, humidifier, inversion, kapalabhati breathing, kapha, light therapy, Locust Pose, lymph, Matsyasana, neti post, pranayama, rejuvenate, relax, rest, root vegetables, SAD, Salabhasana, Salamba Sarvangasana, savasana, seasonal, seasons, Shavasana, shoulder stand, soup, spices, Sun Salutation, sunlight, Surya Namaskara, tea, vata, Vitamin D, warm-up, warming, winter yoga, yoga poses

Winter Yoga

It is important that we change with the seasons just as nature does by adapting our daily habits, yoga practice and food choices. During the winter season, the energy of the Earth and its creatures is drawn inward. We can use this time for restoration and introspection, just as many plants and animals use it for hibernation. In preparation for the spring, it is important to slow down and rejuvenate.

An Ayurvedic approach to winter

There is a rule in Ayurveda that “like attracts like.” That is why the kapha and vata doshas can become provoked and aggravated during the dry, dark, cold months of winter. This is because the climate is alike the qualities of these two doshas. If kapha or vata are triggered, digestive fire plummets, leaving you more susceptible to colds, poor circulation, joint pains and negative emotions. Here are some yoga and lifestyle tips that can help you to balance your doshas this season.

5 Things Your Dog Can Teach You About Yoga

YOGANONYMOUS by YOGANONYMOUS | October 8th, 2013 | 2 Comments
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: crow pose, dog, dogs, downward dog, forgive, forgiveness, meditation, pet, pets, pranayama, savasana, Yoga, yoganonymous

dogs and yogaBy Paula Anderson

“It’s a dog’s life.”

That’s a phrase we hear time and time again. But why is so easy for our pets to seemingly embrace joy?  And what is it about these furry descendants of the wolf that brings us such peace? Could it be that they, too, share an innate love of yoga?

How to Quiet Your Mind in Savasana

Michelle Finerty by Michelle Finerty | September 18th, 2013 | 1 Comment
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: asana, awareness, blissful nothingness, breath, breathing, concentration, corpse pose, How to Quiet Your Mind in Savasana, mantra, meditation, mind, peace, perfection, prana, pranayama, Samadhi, silence, universal consciousness, yoga-practice

Savasana Corpse Pose Yoga

One of the main goals of a regular yoga practice is to be able to reach Samadhi, a state of deep concentration and meditation resulting in union with a greater reality … a greater universal consciousness. When we are in Savasana, we are working toward this state, feeling the benefits of our asana practice, resting our bodies in order to open up to our breath and release all of the tension and thoughts running through our minds — coming to a place of blissful nothingness.

Transition with Grace — On and Off the Mat

Colleen Saidman by Colleen Saidman | November 23rd, 2012 | 12 Comments
topic: Green Living | tags: being in a hurry, breath, change, child's pose, chronic issue, coffee, colleen saidman, dark, divorce, grace, headstand, holiday season, Iyengar, light, maha transitions, marriage, menopause, mindful, morning, nature, pranayama, retirement, Richard Freeman, road rage, rodney yee, Roshi Joan Halifax, savasana, seizure disorder, Supta Virasana, thanksgiving, transition

Yoga at summit

In 2006, Rodney and I had the privilege of taking a few classes with Mr. Iyengar. When it came time for Headstand, I informed the yoga master that I didn’t do them — I have a seizure disorder that I always felt was aggravated by Headstands. He told me, in no uncertain terms, to stand on my head now! And I did. I stayed up, and only came down when he said it was time.

By then, the rest of the class had moved on to Supta Virasana (Reclining Hero Pose), and, trying to be a good student, I came down from Headstand and sat right up to join the rest of the class. That’s the point at which he slapped my back and said, “That is your problem, not Headstand: You transition too quickly and mindlessly. I am sure that you do this in your life as well. You never let anything settle in.” Wow, what an acute teaching for a chronic issue!

Take a (Yoga) Hike!

Nichole Golden by Nichole Golden | August 7th, 2012 | 4 Comments
topic: Fitness, Yoga | tags: Albert Einstein, be present, breath-work, breathing, breathing techniques, bridge pose, cooling yoga poses, exercise, Fitness, focus, hiking, Hiking Yoga, mindful, Moon Salutations, nature, outside, pranayama, presence, seasons, Seated Twists, shoulder stand, stretches, stretching, summer, the Earth, the great outdoors, trail, warm weather, yoga hike

Yoga and Hiking

It seems quite natural during the cresting wave of summer to take ourselves out of the unnatural walls of our indoor environments and into the outdoors, a place where the wild is at play. I believe that includes getting out of the yoga studio! During the warm summer months, we have the unique chance to take our practice into the living, breathing natural world where fresh air and precious stillness are abundant.

Albert Einstein urged us to “look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.” The adventure of hiking and yoga is just that, the chance to explore and deepen our yoga practice against the beautiful backdrop of Earth’s endless landscapes. On the trails, nature’s rhythms bleed their way into our own and start to influence the way we move in the world — and the way we move on our yoga mats — which makes hiking and yoga a perfect summer combination.

Breathing Is Believing: The Importance of Nasal Breathing

Gwen Lawrence by Gwen Lawrence | July 23rd, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Detox, Fitness, Health & Wellness, Yoga | tags: air, belly breathing, breath, breathe through your nose, breathwork, detox, diaphragm, exhalation, exhale, flght or flight response, inhalation, inhale, John Douillard, lungs, mouth breathing, nasal breathing, nasal irrigation, neti pot, nostrils, oxygen, parasympathetic nervous system, prana, pranayama, sympathetic nervous system, toxins, yoga poses

Nasal breathingI grew up during the age of Jane Fonda aerobics marathons and “No pain, no gain” mantras. When the way of the warrior was breathing in through the nose and out through the mouth. As an exercise enthusiast and a dancer throughout college, I lived my life this way without ever questioning the theory. Now I know better: Question everything!

Breathing is a 24-7 unconscious act. Breathing provides necessary oxygen to your body, without which the cells of your body would quickly die. But are you breathing the “right way”?

Did You Finish Breathing Yet?

Jill Miller by Jill Miller | June 27th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Fitness, Yoga | tags: abdominal muscles, abs, body, breath, breathe, breathing techniques, CrossFit, diaphragm, focus, hiccup cure, hiccups, Jill Mller, Kelly Starrett, lungs, mindful, Mobilitywod.com, pranayama, respiration, respiratory system, San Francisco CrossFit, uddiyana bandha, Yoga, yoga class, yoga instructor, Yoga TuneUp

Yoga class standing in Mountain Pose

SCENE: A yoga class. Students are standing in Mountain Pose like a Buddhist “army.”

Teacher: Breathe in…

Class: (A subtle, yet audible “sucking” sound is heard.)

Teacher: And breathe out…

Class: (A subtle, yet audible “whooshing” sound is heard.)

Teacher: Good. Now three more deep breaths just like that.

Class: (They are audibly compliant until…)

Teacher: Now step your right foot back.

Class: (The sound of 25 left feet strike the pose, and no more breathing is heard.)

Teacher: What, no more breathing? Let every movement be a prompt to remind you to breathe for the next 90 minutes.

Class: (Sound of breathing is amplified again, and class proceeds smoothly until … well, the class forgets to breathe again. And again. And again sporadically throughout the class.)

What’s going on here? Why do so many of us forget to breathe? Did you actually finish breathing?

It seems laughable, the notion of “finishing breathing.” Our nervous systems are actually built in such away that breath happens automatically, without us prompting our breathing muscles every few seconds. Think about it, a lot of mental energy is actually required to control every single breath (instead of letting it happen on its own), and our brains have a zillion other tasks to balance. But the breezy thing about breathing is that we can control it, and in so doing we can deliberately impact every system of the body.

The Most Important Part of a Yoga Pose

Jill Miller by Jill Miller | May 24th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Fitness, Yoga | tags: brain, breath, breathe, breathing techniques, clear the mind, inversion, legs up the wall pose, meditation, muscles, nervous system, pranayama, relax, relaxation, self-massage, stress, tension, thoughts, tissues, Unmani Mudra, Veeparita Korani Mudra, yoga poses, Yoga Tune Up, yoga-practice

Yoga PoseHave you ever wondered what to prioritize when you are doing a yoga pose? What is the most important thing to focus on when doing Triangle? Or Downward Dog? Or Savasana? Ask 15 different yoga teachers from different yoga lineages and you will likely get 15 different answers. Is alignment the most important? Is it the breath? Awareness? Eye gaze? What is it?

I have wrestled with this question myself and have attempted to deconstruct hundreds of poses to figure out what is most important … but after 29 years of practice (yep, I’ve been practicing since I was a kid!) there is one element that I come back to again and again — and it might surprise you!

Activate Your Hope Chakra

Chrissy Carter by Chrissy Carter | April 18th, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: Anahata chakra, asana, bija mantra, breath, breathe, breathing technique, Chair Pose, corpse pose, darkness, depression, Fierce Pose, fourth chakra, heart chakra, HOPE, hopelessness, light, lotus pose, meditation, mountain-pose, Padmasana, pranayama, Rabindranath Tagore, savasana, Standing Forward Bend, Sun Salutation, Surya Namaskara, Tadasana, Utkatasana, Uttanasana, vinyasa, YAM, yoga poses

Chrissy Carter

Practice yoga with Chrissy Carter’s Chaturanga Vinyasa Flow video on GaiamTV.com.

It is impossible to know hope until one has experienced hopelessness — that feeling of suffocating permanence, as if you will be forever trapped in your present situation. In a place of hopelessness, all feels irrevocably lost. We harden and brace ourselves for permanent pain in the same way that we gather and store reserves in preparation for a long, hard winter. It’s as if the shutters have been closed and all the lights turned off. Lost in the darkness, we succumb to avidya (ignorance), the belief that our finite experience is all-pervasive and interminable. Helpless, hapless and hopeless, it is impossible to imagine a light at the end of the tunnel, and we start to lose sight of the big picture.

But in these times, hope can be a light in the darkness, filtering through the slats in the shutters, shifting the shadows in our dark room from ominous to promising. Suddenly and against all odds, we can find compassion for ourselves in the face of suffering.