non-toxic

Cleaner Yoga

Kimberly Delaney by Kimberly Delaney | May 10th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Yoga | tags: athlete's feet, athlete's foot, bacteria, bare feet, feet, foot fungus, green cleaning, how clean yoga mat, non-toxic, nontoxic toys, toenail fungus, Yoga, yoga mat cleaner, yoga mats, yoga_positions

If yoga is supposed to be all about connecting mind, body, and spirit, why is it that the first thing I think of at the start of every yoga class is how much I need a pedicure? This not-so-spiritual thought leads logically into looking around at everyone else’s feet, a bad idea in general and especially in yoga class.

Even Yoga Journal admits there is a problem — athlete’s foot running rampant through yoga studios. The symptoms are cracked, itchy, peeling and sometimes blistered skin. Mmmmm. Let athlete’s foot run its course, and pretty soon you’ll be the proud owner of even less attractive and harder to treat toenail fungus. Here’s how to avoid this yogi’s nightmare.

Summer Breeze, Makes Me Feel Fine

Cheryl Terrace by Cheryl Terrace | July 12th, 2011 | 3 Comments
topic: Green Living | tags: air, air fresheners, apartment, breeze, chemicals, clean, fresh, home, house, non-toxic, open windows, scented candles, scents, smells, summer, toxins, ventilation, wind

Summer Breeze

I’m a bit of a fanatic regarding pure air. I once (single-handedly) moved a dresser into the hallway of a charming B&B because of the mothball smell (my boyfriend at the time was not impressed). Admittedly, it has never been easy being me/green — I smell everything! Synthetic perfumes, soaps, laundry detergents, “air fresheners” and other conventional “fresh smells” gag me. (I must have been a bloodhound in a previous life.)

Give Your Manicure a Makeover

Girlfriend@Gaiam by Girlfriend@Gaiam | January 7th, 2011 | 7 Comments
topic: Girlfriend@Gaiam, Green Living | tags: beauty, biodegradable, carcinogens, colors, corn, Cosmetics, cuticle, DBP, dibutyl phthalate, eco-friendly, feet, fingernails, formaldehyde, hands, healthy, manicure, nail polish, natural, non-toxic, nontoxic, orange oil, pedicure, petroleum, pink, pretty, Priti, remover, safe, soy, spa, Spring, toenails, toluene, toxins

Priti non-toxic nail polish
Last night I went out with some girlfriends for a little spa treatment and I turned a few heads when I pulled out my own little travel mani and pedi toolkit, packed with all the essentials including my non-toxic nail polish and nail polish remover. After all, an eco-girl doesn’t have to be less fabulous to be eco-chic.

Affecting Your Reality

Annie B. Bond by Annie B. Bond | October 29th, 2010 | 1 Comment
topic: Green Living, Healthy Home, Inspirational Media, Personal Growth | tags: bathroom, bathtub, chemical-free, cleaner, Deepak Chopra, eco-friendly cleaning supplies, environment, Home Enlightenment, natural solutions, non-toxic, obstacles, passion, perseverance, reality, The Book of Secrets

Empowered woman

Affect your level of commitment

Being able to affect your whole reality at once is the essence of “simultaneous interdependent co-arising.” There is no limit to how far your influence can reach but to find that out you must engage life with passion. When you do anything with passion, you express every aspect of who you are. Passion releases all the energy you possess. If you throw everything you have into a pursuit, your defects and weaknesses are also exposed. Passion brings up everything.

A Guide to Green Air Fresheners

Kimberly Delaney by Kimberly Delaney | December 3rd, 2008 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Green Living, Health & Wellness, Healthy Home | tags: air fresheners, clean, green cleaning, home, non-toxic, toxins

Most air fresheners do much more to affect our sense of smell than they do to improve the air itself. More to the point, they can pollute your home with a host of chemicals, including phthalates, which work to prolong the life of fragrance. But phthalates have been linked to hormonal and reproductive developmental problems in kids. Air freshener products also typically contain xylene, which affects the nervous system and naphthalene, a suspected carcinogen.