mother

How Much Yoga Is Enough?

Kate Hanley by Kate Hanley | June 10th, 2013 | 4 Comments
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: at home yoga, breathing, child's pose, down dog, gym, kids, meditation, mind-body, mother, stress, Yoga, yoga studios, yoga teacher training

I’ve been practicing yoga for close to two decades. The awareness and grounding it offers has steadied me through cross-country moves, crazy deadlines, tragic breakups, getting married and becoming a mother. Yet when I had the second of my two kids in just over two years, I gave up all forms of mind-body practice cold turkey. I just couldn’t take on anything that wasn’t directly related to keeping those kids alive and cared for.

May: A Month for Mothers

Spiritual Cinema Circle by Spiritual Cinema Circle | April 24th, 2013 | No Comments
topic: Inspirational Media, Personal Growth | tags: Chaske Spencer, communication, daughter, DVD club, family, Fetch, films, Gil Birmingham, grandmother, In Transit, Korinna Sehringer, May, mother, motherhood, mothers-day, movies, Native American, OMG, Q’orianka Kilcher, Shouting Secrets, Spiritual Cinema Circle, Stephen Simon

What does the idea of “family” mean to you?  Spiritual Cinema Circle’s May film selections explore family, identity and home.

In the short film OMG, a teenage girl and her grandmother learn to communicate in the modern age, with hilarious results. In Transit shows a touching encounter between strangers at a bus stop who find they have more in common than they think. And Fetch is the story of a young boy who is trying desperately to find his mother.

March: Just in Time

Spiritual Cinema Circle by Spiritual Cinema Circle | February 18th, 2013 | No Comments
topic: Inspirational Media, Personal Growth | tags: 2013, Argentina, Awaken, bedtime story, broken hearts, Chinese Take-Away, daughter, father, love, March, memories, mother, movies, personal development, Personal Growth, Pioneer, Ricardo Darin, Roger Ebert, short films, son, South by Southwest Film Festival, Spiritual Cinema Circle, spirituality, Stephen Simon, The Camera, Tick Tock Time Emporium, time, time travel, Un Cuento Chino

The March film selections from Spiritual Cinema Circle focus on how we measure the value of our time.

Chinese Take-Away (Un Cuento Chino) is the feature film for subscribers in the U.S. and Canada. Directed by Ricardo Darin, this film from Argentina is a powerful story about two men from completely different worlds who, in the most unlikely ways, help each other heal their broken hearts and spirits. Film critic Roger Ebert awarded it his top rating.

Awaken, this month’s feature film for international subscribers, is a mind-bending and heart-opening time-travel love story where two lovers meet and change each other’s lives in a completely unique environment.

The Camera is a haunting, wordless short film that reminds us of the power of  love and the magic of memories.

In Tick Tock Time Emporium, a girl who desperately wants more time with her mother enters a strange shop where time is actually for sale.

Pioneer focuses on a mysterious, haunting bedtime story that a father tells his son. This powerful short film was voted the Best Narrative Short at the South by Southwest Film Festival.

What to Do When Your Child Lies

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | November 15th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: child's behavior, children, confess, control issues, converstaion, dad, daughter, father, feelings, good liars, honest, honesty, kids, lies, lying, misbehaving, misbehavior, mom, mother, parenting advice, parenting problems, parents, problem, rules, son, talk, tell the truth

A reader recently wrote me to ask for advice about a common parenting problem:

My 6-year-old lies to me on a daily basis. He hides food in his room and lies about it, among other things. How can I get him to tell the truth?

I consider a child’s misbehavior to be a flashing neon sign announcing that something else is going on that needs to be addressed. In other words, the lying and deceptive behavior is a symptom of something else.

Raising Hope-Full Children

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | May 18th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: being present, children, confidence, confident, dad, families, family, HOPE, hopeful, mom, mother, optimistic, parent, parenting, Parenting Without Power Struggles, preteen, self confidence

Hopeful children

The first title I imagined for the parenting book I would someday write was Please Don’t Let the Light in Your Child’s Eyes Grow Dim. I had run into a 12-year-old girl whom I’d known at the age of four, when she was one of the brightest, most vibrant kids I had ever met. When I saw her at 12, I hardly recognized her. She was slumped into herself, subdued, and her light was … dim.

As I began writing, I was determined to articulate what I had come to understand about how to help children manifest their gifts and head into adulthood with joy and passion.

Hope and the Post-Baby Body

Nancy Alder by Nancy Alder | May 16th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: baby, children, Gaiam Hope Project, handstand, kids, Lao Tzu, mother, motherhood, parenting, Plank Pose, post-baby body, pre-baby body, pregnancy, pregnant, Samuel Smiles, strength, strong, Yoga, yoga class, yoga-practice

Hope and Post-Baby BodyKnowing others is intelligence; knowing yourself is true wisdom. Mastering others is strength; mastering yourself is true power.~Lao Tzu

Although all mothers know this, no one can truly warn you before it happens: Your body is never the same after you have a baby as it was before you got pregnant.

Sure, we see images of movie stars who bounce back from having babies more toned and fit than they were before pregnancy, but the reality for most women is much less seamless. Having a baby affects you inside and out: You stretch and move differently, and your anatomy changes — permanently — from that growing being inside your body. That pair of skinny jeans, your high school dress and your once stretch-mark-free body often become just a distant memory. This change can make women feel imperfect or less attractive than they remember themselves to be.

When I walked into the room for my first “official yoga class” (read: not with a DVD at home, which had been my practice for years) I felt weak. I was mom to a two-year-old and a four-year-old and I was out of shape. My stomach was flabby from cesarean sections, my leg muscles shaky and my self-image less than ideal. Feeling neither powerful nor like a rock star, I just hoped that yoga would help me get back the body I once had.

It wasn’t until the day that I held Plank Pose in yoga class that I finally got it: I still had an amazing body.

Yoga, Motherhood and Hope

Michelle Finerty by Michelle Finerty | April 27th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Relationships, Yoga | tags: anticipation, calm, children, desire, detox, energy, expectation, faith, HOPE, kids, mom, mother, motherhood, motivation, peace, retreat, twists, Yoga, yoga for kids

Mother and daughter doing yogaHope, expectation, anticipation, the desire for a certain outcome. Hope is what moves us forward, motivates us and keeps our faith strong during the hard times. Hope is essential for our existence; yet there are times — when the world seems to be in a state of chaos — when it is easy to wonder where hope is.

In thinking about hope and how to find it in our world, I realized that for me, hope comes from my yoga practice and my kids, as both remind me on a constant basis that hope dwells within us, not outside of ourselves, and that in order to tap into that wellspring of hope, it is essential to find the peace within to let hope blossom.

Parenting Without Power Struggles: Susan Stiffelman on ‘The Today Show’

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | March 15th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: children, Hoda Kotb, Kathie Lee Gifford, kids, mom, mother, parenting, Parenting Without Power Struggles, Susan Stiffelman, temper tantrum, The Today Show, video

Parenting Without Power Struggles

Gaiam parenting blogger Susan Stiffelman appeared on The Today Show yesterday to chat with hosts Hoda Kotb and Kathie Lee Gifford about her book, Parenting Without Power Struggles. Watch the video of Susan explaining how to defuse a temper tantrum on the Today show website (or by clicking the image above) and learn more about the book (and sign up for Susan’s free parenting e-newsletter) on her website, ParentingWithoutPowerStuggles.com.

How to Make the Holidays a Time of Positive Change (Even If You’re Alone!)

Laura Day by Laura Day | November 14th, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: arguments, brother, change, christmas, communication, desires, dreams, family, father, fighting, friends, goals, Hanukkah, holidays, husband, intuition, kids, mother, new year's, parents, positive change, relationship patterns, resolutions, sister, thanksgiving, transformation, wife, winter

Happy family eating holiday dinner
You can make the holidays a time of dramatic change and healing by using your innate intuitive abilities in a conscious and directed way.

Holidays are supposed to be a time when families unite, when you are reminded of your childhood or revisit the memories of yourself over the years. You may be spending this time alone or far from home. But no matter where you are or who you are with, the holidays provide you with a unique opportunity to heal the inner patterns and relationships that have been obstructing your life and hindering your dreams.

Servin’ It Up Family Style

Bevin Wallace by Bevin Wallace | March 15th, 2011 | 1 Comment
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: balanced diet, buffet, children, choices, cooking, decision-making, diet, different, dinner, family, family-style dining, father, food, food waste, healthy-eating, kids, kitchen table, manners, meals, mealtime, mother, motherhood, parenting, parents, pasta, patience, portions, recipe, salad, self-esteem, serving, sharing, sugar, supper, try, vegetables, water, water pitcher

Family-Style Dinner

I think it’s safe to say that one of the things we modern-day moms do a bit more than our moms did is baby our kids, especially when it comes to what they eat. Some of this is good, of course. Regulating intake of sugar and processed foods is probably not something best left up to people whose idea of a balanced meal is beef jerky and fruit snacks. But at some point, kids need to learn to make their own good choices, right? When and how we do that is each family’s decision, but for me the food thing was getting ridiculous.