longevity

What My Daily Practice Looks Like

Jill Miller by Jill Miller | March 1st, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Fitness, Yoga | tags: backbends, core, corpse pose, daily yoga practice, dance, handstand, inversions, Leg Stretch #3, longevity, matador circles, meditation, Monk Walks, movement, posture, Psoas, rotator cuff, savasana, self-massage, Shoulder stabilization, Side Bends, squats, twist, Twisted Triangle, uddihyana bandha, Veeparita Korani Mudra, yoga block, yoga instructor, yoga poses, yoga teacher, yoga therapy balls, Yoga Tune Up, Zobha

Daily Yoga PracticeStudent: Jill, what do you actually do for your personal yoga practice?

Me: I practice what I teach.

Student: You mean you don’t do anything else? Spinning? Or running? Or Zumba? I mean, how do you get your arms to look like that?

Me: I don’t mean to sound cryptic … but I practice what I teach.

It’s true. I have been practicing yoga and multiple movement arts since I was 11 years old, and the yoga practice I teach in the classroom (I began teaching part-time at age 19 at The Omega Institute) has evolved and changed with me through the past two decades. The work I share in my classes, workshops, conferences and videos all resonates with my own discoveries in my personal “jungle gym” of a practice.

Why You Should Not Stop Taking Your Vitamins

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | November 14th, 2011 | 1 Comment
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging | tags: cardiac, death, health, healthy, heart disease, hormone replacement therapy, HRT, iron, longevity, medical studies, medicine, multi-vitamins, multivitamins, nutrients, nutritional supplements, obesity, oxidative stress, science, scientific study, vitamins

Woman taking a multivitaminDo vitamins kill people?

How many people have died from taking vitamins?

Should you stop your vitamins?

It depends. To be exact, it depends on the quality of the science, and the very nature of scientific research. It is very hard to know things exactly through science. The waste bin of science is full of fallen heroes like Premarin, Vioxx and Avandia (which alone was responsible for 47,000 excess cardiac deaths since it was introduced in 1999).

That brings us to the latest apparent casualty: vitamins. The recent media hype around vitamins is a classic case of drawing the wrong conclusions from good science.

The Unseen Benefits of Physical Fitness

The FIRM Master Instructor Team by The FIRM Master Instructor Team | April 8th, 2011 | 5 Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging, Weight Loss | tags: aging, anxiety, benefits of physical fitness, blood pressure, body composition, bone health, cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiovascular, cholesterol, depression, diabetes, diet, exercise, Fitness, flexibility, health, heart disease, life span, longevity, metabolic syndrome, metabolism, muscular endurance, nutrition, obesity, osteoporosis, sarcopenia, the firm, uscular strength, weight-loss, working out, workout

Fitness BenefitsMost of us pursue fitness in order to look good. In this quest, we run an extra mile to lose five pounds or pick up a heavier weight to trim our arms. A balanced fitness program and sensible eating habits are powerful tools for weight loss. However, the same tools we use to look our best and lose weight are also powerful tools in maintaining the quality of our lives and our health.

What is physical fitness? Physical fitness includes five health-related components: muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiorespiratory fitness, flexibility and body composition. The FIRM workouts are designed with these components in mind. Once you’ve begun to see results on the scale, in your jeans and with your tape measure, what are the benefits you don’t see?

The Real Secret to Healthy Aging

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | May 18th, 2010 | 4 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: dr. mark hyman, health, longevity, Mark Hyman, mitochondria, resveratrol, UltraWellness, wellness, wine

“Live to 120 years old by eating as much as you want and drinking lots of red wine!”

That’s the intriguing finding of a recent study from Harvard researcher David Sinclair and his group.