kids | pg.2

How to Approach Frustrated Children

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | September 21st, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: adapt, adaptation, change, children, cry, crying, dad, frustrated, frustration, happy, kids, mom, parenting, parents, tantrums, tears

Crying child

Childhood is full of frustrating moments. Nature has designed life in such a way as to guarantee that children will have their wishes denied many times a day. Kids are small, physically disadvantaged, in need of support that isn’t always available, and desirous of all sorts of things that their caretakers determine aren’t good for them.

As loving parents, we hate it when our children cry, and we’ll jump through hoops to keep their tears at bay. We buy them the toys they can’t live without, force their big sisters to play Barbies with them, or let them stay up late even though we know they’ll be tired the next day.

But when we intervene every time our children become frustrated — believing we’re doing so out of love and care — we prevent them from learning the lesson of adaptation.

Family-Friendly Spa Vacations to Rejuvenate All Ages

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | July 30th, 2012 | 5 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Family Health, Green Living, Health & Wellness | tags: acne, Arizona Grand Resort & Spa, Austin, baby massage, beauty, body wrap, California, children, Chocolate Spa, dad, Disney Aulani Resort, facial, family vacation, Fitness, Grand Wailea, hawaii, Hawaiian lomi lomi treatment, Hotel Hershey, Hyatt Regency Hill Country Resort & Spa, Hyatt Regency Lost Pine Resort, hydrotherapy, kids, Laniwai Spa, manicure, massage, Maui, mom, nail polish, North Carolina, Oahu, Painted Sky, parents, pedicure, Pennsylvania, Phoenix, Pinehurst Resort, relaxation, San Antonio, san diego, scrub, Sea Spa at Loews Coronado Bay Resort, skincare, Spa at Pinehurst, Spa Grande, spa package, spa vacation, spray-tanning, stress-relief, teenagers, teens, Texas, The SPAhhhT, wellness, Wild Hare Youth Spa, Windflower: The Hill Country Spa, Yoga

Family Spa Vacation

Sometimes I almost regret introducing my 14-year-old daughter to the delights of massage therapy, since she’s now as avid as I am to enjoy the relief and recalibration that come with a good professional treatment, which rarely comes cheap. Yet as a dancer, runner and dedicated student, she benefits as much as I do from the health advantages of bodywork, or even an occasional pedicure treat for her tired feet.

Lately, I’ve found myself thinking that a mother-daughter spa getaway might be refreshing for both us, and a fun way to connect outside our usual daily routine of overly packed schedules.

Traditionally, spa vacations have been romantic retreats for couples or escapes for harried women who juggle too much. Today, however, as kids’ lives get ever busier and stress becomes an issue that even preteens are dealing with, a family spa experience in a restful setting can accomplish two purposes: vacation time together while nurturing wellness for all ages.

How To Green Your School

E.B. Boyd by E.B. Boyd | July 30th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Green Living | tags: children, compost, composting, eco, eco-conscious, education, education and recycling, environmentally friendly, go green, green, green kids, Green Living, green-power, kids, landfills, parents, recycle, recycling bins, reduce, reuse, school, school recycling program, teachers

School recycling program

It’s back to school time for most families, which means it’s a great time to think about how your school is doing on the green front — especially when it comes to the basics, like recycling.

If your school doesn’t already have a recycling program in place, consider starting one. Experts say the general steps to follow are:

Objects on Foot Are Closer Than They Appear

Ginny Figlar Colón by Ginny Figlar Colón | July 13th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Fitness, Green Living, Green Tech, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Weight Loss | tags: car, car-free, children, community, dad, drive, driving, exercise, exerise, family, Fitness, Google Maps, health, healthy, kids, mom, neighborhood, parenting, pedestrian-friendly, running errands, stroller, take a walk, walk score, walkability, walking, walking directions, WalkScore, weight-loss

Happy family walking togetherIt usually takes me seven minutes to get to my daughter’s preschool. Today, it took 27.

That’s because, for the first time in 18 months, I strapped my 11-month-old son into the double stroller and walked there.

I like to walk. Our family of four has one car, and in the two years that we’ve owned it, we’ve only put 14,000 miles on the odometer.

I’m not alone. According to a 2011 survey conducted by the National Association of Realtors, nearly 80 percent of respondents look for homes in pedestrian-friendly areas and 59 percent would choose a smaller home if it meant less driving.

Still, I find that once I’ve gotten into the habit of driving someplace — my daughter’s preschool, the Trader Joe’s on the other side of the highway, the garden store — I tend to keep on driving there, deeming it too far to reach on foot. The funny thing is, once I decide to test walking to a destination once, I realize not only how doable it is but also how satisfying running that errand becomes.

So now I’m on a quest of sorts: to debunk the myth that certain places in my everyday life are too far to reach on foot.

Kids Unleashed

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | June 5th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Family Health, Fitness, Green Living, Health & Wellness | tags: abduction, asthma, bike to school, childhood obesity, Etan Patz, exercise, Fitness, high blood pressure, kids, milk carton, missing child, nature, outdoors, outside, parenting, physical activity, safety, stranger danger, type 2 diabetes, unsupervised children, walk to school

Group Of Children Running In Park

My nine-year-old is covered with mosquito bites, bruises and scratches. From the time she arrives home from school until I call her for dinner, she’s AWOL — running through woods, building forts out of sticks, catching toads … .

To hear some parents tell it, the fact that I haven’t a clue exactly where my nine-year-old is for an hour or more at a time is evidence of poor parenting, if not outright criminal neglect. And with a recent arrest in the cold case of six-year-old Etan Patz (the first missing child to have his face on a milk carton), this sentiment increasingly runs high.

Find Hope in Your Dream

Gwen Lawrence by Gwen Lawrence | May 18th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: abuse, belief, child, childhood, desire, goals, HOPE, inspiration, kids, motivation, overcoming fear, parenting, perseverance, persevere, positive thinking, prayer, trauma, trust, Yoga

tulip

We all need it, we all have it, we all draw from it, we all seek it, and without it there is nothing left: hope.

The ability to persevere comes from inside — it is a part of you. When life throws you a curveball, when your path becomes a grinding mountain instead of a downhill glide, when there seems there is no way out, you must draw from your inner well of hope.

Whether to fulfill our goals or to fight to survive, we all draw from our same inner supply of hope. It is the first thing we should teach our children. Hope is a necessary component of survival and as sweet as hoping for a shiny red bicycle for Christmas.

Hope and the Post-Baby Body

Nancy Alder by Nancy Alder | May 16th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: baby, children, Gaiam Hope Project, handstand, kids, Lao Tzu, mother, motherhood, parenting, Plank Pose, post-baby body, pre-baby body, pregnancy, pregnant, Samuel Smiles, strength, strong, Yoga, yoga class, yoga-practice

Hope and Post-Baby BodyKnowing others is intelligence; knowing yourself is true wisdom. Mastering others is strength; mastering yourself is true power.~Lao Tzu

Although all mothers know this, no one can truly warn you before it happens: Your body is never the same after you have a baby as it was before you got pregnant.

Sure, we see images of movie stars who bounce back from having babies more toned and fit than they were before pregnancy, but the reality for most women is much less seamless. Having a baby affects you inside and out: You stretch and move differently, and your anatomy changes — permanently — from that growing being inside your body. That pair of skinny jeans, your high school dress and your once stretch-mark-free body often become just a distant memory. This change can make women feel imperfect or less attractive than they remember themselves to be.

When I walked into the room for my first “official yoga class” (read: not with a DVD at home, which had been my practice for years) I felt weak. I was mom to a two-year-old and a four-year-old and I was out of shape. My stomach was flabby from cesarean sections, my leg muscles shaky and my self-image less than ideal. Feeling neither powerful nor like a rock star, I just hoped that yoga would help me get back the body I once had.

It wasn’t until the day that I held Plank Pose in yoga class that I finally got it: I still had an amazing body.

Cultivating a Dreamer

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | May 4th, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: attention span, children, creativity, daydreams, dreamer, focus, future, grades, HOPE, imagination, kids, parenting, school, teachers

Daydreaming boyMy son is a dreamer. An absent-minded sort of kid who responds to every question with silence. Who’s always looking intently off in the distance or up at the ceiling. Then, when the question is repeated, he’ll look as if he’s just noticed you’re there and say, “Wha?”

It’s a trait that, not surprisingly, drives some of his teachers mad.

Yoga, Motherhood and Hope

Michelle Finerty by Michelle Finerty | April 27th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Relationships, Yoga | tags: anticipation, calm, children, desire, detox, energy, expectation, faith, HOPE, kids, mom, mother, motherhood, motivation, peace, retreat, twists, Yoga, yoga for kids

Mother and daughter doing yogaHope, expectation, anticipation, the desire for a certain outcome. Hope is what moves us forward, motivates us and keeps our faith strong during the hard times. Hope is essential for our existence; yet there are times — when the world seems to be in a state of chaos — when it is easy to wonder where hope is.

In thinking about hope and how to find it in our world, I realized that for me, hope comes from my yoga practice and my kids, as both remind me on a constant basis that hope dwells within us, not outside of ourselves, and that in order to tap into that wellspring of hope, it is essential to find the peace within to let hope blossom.

Parenting Without Power Struggles: Susan Stiffelman on ‘The Today Show’

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | March 15th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: children, Hoda Kotb, Kathie Lee Gifford, kids, mom, mother, parenting, Parenting Without Power Struggles, Susan Stiffelman, temper tantrum, The Today Show, video

Parenting Without Power Struggles

Gaiam parenting blogger Susan Stiffelman appeared on The Today Show yesterday to chat with hosts Hoda Kotb and Kathie Lee Gifford about her book, Parenting Without Power Struggles. Watch the video of Susan explaining how to defuse a temper tantrum on the Today show website (or by clicking the image above) and learn more about the book (and sign up for Susan’s free parenting e-newsletter) on her website, ParentingWithoutPowerStuggles.com.