hunger

5 Ways to Beat the Nighttime Nosh

The FIRM Master Instructor Team by The FIRM Master Instructor Team | March 15th, 2013 | 3 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: active relaxation, after dark, avoid TV, break the cycle, calorie allocation, calories, computer, consuming, diet plan, dinner, eat less, eat more, eating patterns, evening activities, fatigue vs. hunger, food after dinner, food before bed, food habits, food journal, food strategies, go to bed, gorge, hunger, inhibitions, junk food, keep busy after dinner, kitchen, knitting, late in the day, late night, late-night noshing, less likely to snack, midnight snacks, nail painting, nighttime eating, nutrition, nutrition expert, obesity, reduced calories, Sara Ryba, self-monitoring, sleepover, snack choices, snack plan, snacking, snacks, successful weight loss, the firm, use your hands, weight problems, weight-loss, weight-loss obstacles, young

by The FIRM nutrition expert Sara Ryba, R.D., C.D.N.

I remember my first sleepover as a young child, when my friend’s mom said we could have a midnight snack. It was so exciting to be able to eat junk food so late at night!

Of course, my opportunities to gorge like that were few and far between. But regular late-night noshing plagues many of us and can cause weight problems if you don’t control it.

Do you find that you consume too many calories after dinner? Are you continually returning to the kitchen for “one more thing”? Do you wake up in the morning annoyed that you snacked too much the night before? If so, you are not alone. Studies have suggested that people feel less inhibited to overdo the snacks after dark.

So, let’s do something about it! Nighttime eating is my weight-loss clients’ single most common obstacle. But it is a challenge worth taking on, as conquering this habit will open the door to long-lasting, successful weight loss.

Who Knew Emotions Were So “Weighty”?

The FIRM Master Instructor Team by The FIRM Master Instructor Team | July 19th, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Green Living, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: bad habits, binge, binging, calories, cravings, depression, diet, dieting, eat your feelings, emotional, emotions, exercise, Fitness, food, friends, habits, healthy habits, healthy-eating, hobby, hunger, isolation, meditate, meditation, nutrition, overeat, overeating, portion control, self-control, stress, stress eating, support, the firm, weight gain, weight-loss, work out, workout

I did a Google search on what causes stress in people’s lives and I found things like unemployment, divorce, financial problems, health issues, fatigue and so on. In reflecting on how I deal with stress, let’s just say that far, far less than unemployment has caused me to eat a dozen donuts in one sitting!

Yes, I’m talking about stress eating. Most of us have had the unfortunate pleasure of experiencing it at one point or another, and it is not for the faint of heart. I can down a whole can of party peanuts if Auden has a particularly bad day at school! Thankfully I have come to terms with the real me and I am now able to recognize the signs of impending stress and do a fairly good job of not eating us out of house and home when things get rough. Please allow me to share some of my tips, and I welcome any you have to share that have worked for you.

Sugar Addiction? It Might Be Genetic

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | April 15th, 2011 | 3 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: addiction, addicts, alcohol, amino acids, appetite, artificial sweeteners, bedtime, blood sugar, breakfast, chemicals, Chromium, cravings, diabetes, diet, dopamine receptor, dr. mark hyman, drugs, eating before bed, food, food allergies, Food sensitivities, fruit juice, genes, genetics, glucomannan, glutamine, hormones, hunger, inflammation, insulin, medical research, neurotransmitters, nutrition, nutritional deficiencies, omega-3 fatty acids, pleasure, protein, refined sugar, reward centers, Rhodiola, science, sleep, small meals, soda, stress, sugar, tyrosine and 5-HTP, Vitamin D, weight-loss, willpower

Hand reaching into a cookie jarWe’re all programmed to like sugar, but new research shows that some people are genetically much more prone to sugar addiction than others.

As I noted in my previous blog on food addiction, science demonstrates that people can be biologically addicted to sugar and other foods in the same way people can be addicted to heroin, cocaine or nicotine. Bingeing and addictive behaviors are eerily similar in alcoholics and sugar addicts. In fact, many recovering alcoholics switch to another easily available drug: sugar.

Gourmet Is a Good Thing

Bevin Wallace by Bevin Wallace | January 31st, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Green Living, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: breakfast, childhood obesity, children, clean your plate, diet, dinner, environmental, food, force-feeding, fresh produce, fruits and vegetables, fun, gourmet, health, healthy-eating, hunger, hungry, in-season, ingredients, junk food, kids, local farms, lunch, meals, mother, organic, parenting, picky eater, processed, recipes, soup, sugar, sustainable, weight, whole grain

Boy eating dinner at a restaurantI know it might sound obnoxious at first and that I sound a little like Martha Stewart with that headline, but I like the idea of raising gourmet kids. By “gourmet,” I don’t mean kids who demand white tablecloths and truffle oil. What I mean is simply someone with an appreciation of good food. Here’s how Webster’s defines it:

Food Addiction: Could It Explain Why 70% of Americans Are Overweight?

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | December 7th, 2010 | 6 Comments
topic: Detox, Family Health, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: addictive, alcohol, appetite, calories, childhood obesity, children, detox, diet, disease, drugs, eating, fat, food addiction, food industry, government regulation, Huffington Post, hunger, junk food, kids, labeling, Mark Hyman, menu, michael pollan, nutrition, overeating, overweight, parenting, portion control, restaurants, school lunch, suger, weight-loss, withdrawal

Woman eating doughnuts

Our government and food industry both encourage more “personal responsibility” when it comes to battling the obesity epidemic and its associated diseases. They say people should exercise more self-control, make better choices, avoid overeating and reduce their intake of sugar-sweetened drinks and processed food. We are led to believe that there is no good food or bad food — that it’s all just a matter of balance.

Why Eating a Low-Fat Diet Doesn’t Lead to Weight Loss

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | August 18th, 2010 | 2 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: aging, Alzheimer's, appetite, belly, blood sugar, calories, cancer, cholesterol, diabetes, food, genes, glucose test, glycemic load, heart disease, hormones, hunger, insulin, low-fat diet, medical study, metabolism, nutrigenomics, obesity, overweight, triglycerides, waist, weight-loss

Man on scaleDespite the common observation that obesity runs in families, genetic research shows that the habits you inherit from your family are more important than the genes you inherit. Obesity genes account for only 5 percent of all weight problems. So, we have to wonder, what causes the other 95 percent of weight problems?