heart disease

Free Seminar! Beyond Addiction: Recovery 2.0

Tommy Rosen by Tommy Rosen | February 18th, 2013 | 3 Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: alcohol addiction, beyond addiction, childhood obesity, destructive behaviors, drug addiction, drugs, family, field of addition, food addiction, freedom, friends, getting clean, heart disease, lies, life beyond addiction, lying, medical pandemics, meditation, modalities of recovery, money addiction, optimal health, recovery 2.0, sex addiction, stress management, Tadasana Festival, the recovery diet, the twelve steps, Tommy Rosen, twisted thinking, type 2 diabetes, vibrant life, Yoga

tommy rosen

What is addiction? How does it feel to be an addict? What does it look like? Is there a way out, a place BEYOND ADDICTION? These critical questions and the way we answer them make the difference between living a life enslaved to destructive behaviors and one of freedom and expansion.

Most people are familiar with addiction to drugs or alcohol, but addiction takes many forms and it is everywhere around us, all the time. At its very core, addiction is any behavior you continue to engage in despite the negative consequences it brings. If we take the time to really look at ourselves and at the world around us, we don’t have to look hard to see it. Addiction is the root of some of the biggest challenges our society faces today. For example, the medical pandemics of childhood obesity, type 2-diabetes and heart disease are preventable lifestyle diseases driven in large part by addiction.

As an addict you feel stuck, incapable of giving up that thing that you “need” to survive, to function. It twists your thinking, your experience of the world. Addiction leaves you lying to your friends, to your family, to yourself. Being an addict is like being in a small dark room where the only exit seems to be locked from the outside.

The truth is that there is a way out, a way BEYOND ADDICTION. Though neither easy, nor a road one travels alone, a life beyond the grips of addiction is very real. At one time I was stuck in that downward spiral, but after 21 years of recovery I am living proof that an expansive and vibrant life beyond addiction can and does exist.

An Attitude of Gratitude

The FIRM Master Instructor Team by The FIRM Master Instructor Team | November 20th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth | tags: American Red Cross, attitude, beauty, blessings, Blood Donor, breast-cancer, children, family, give thanks, good health, grateful, gratitude, heart disease, high blood pressure, joy, karma, laughter, mantra, meditation, mindfulness, moment, Platelet Donor, Red Cross, simple pleasures, sister, stroke, thanksgiving, whale watching

Boy jumping in puddleBy The FIRM Master Instructor Marguerite O’Brien

While I try to be mindful of the blessings in my life and give thanks on a daily basis, there are times when I am humbled by life’s circumstances and my gratefulness is magnified. I’ve had several experiences recently that I wanted to share with you, in hopes that they will inspire you to take a moment to be present to what is going on around you and give silent thanks for every blessing.

10 Reasons to Quit Your Coffee

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | July 6th, 2012 | 8 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: 5-HIA, acidity, addiction, antioxidants, blood sugar, caffeine, cardiovascular disease, catecholamines, cholesterol, chronic disease, coffee habit, cortisol, detox, diabesity, diet, diterpenes, doctor, dysbiosis, energy, GERD, glucose levels, glycemic index, health, healthy, heart burn, heart disease, Huffington Post, indigestion, inflammation, insomnia, insulin resistance, Mark Hyman, nutrition, serotonin, sleep, stress, triglycerides, type 2 diabetes, withdrawal

10 Reasons to Quit Coffee

Coffee: Is it good or bad for us? You might get media whiplash trying to figure that out. The truth is, I find this subject to be as confusing as you probably do.

After all, the media certainly doesn’t help clarify whether America’s favorite morning beverage is going to land you in the doc’s office or set you free with a clean bill of health. It’s no wonder so many of you shrug your shoulders in utter confusion as you refill your morning mug and get on with your day!

I know all about this adoration of coffee. I, too, was smitten and enamored with Coffea Arabica. We had our courtship during the 1990s, when I worked more than 80 hours in the emergency room and saw 30 to 40 patients a day.

I traded sleep for espresso, authentic energy for Haagen Daz coffee ice cream and normal circadian rhythms for high-speed, caffeinated adrenaline rushes.

But then, my body began to communicate to me what I had been attempting to ignore — that I needed to slow down and let the natural systems assume their proper course. You can read more about how I successfully turned my health around here.

As I began to tune into my body and provide it with what it really wanted — fresh, whole, real, unprocessed foods; sleep; relaxation; and the time to enjoy the life I had created for myself and my family — I was able to break up with coffee and make up with my health.

You can too, and I’m going to tell you how. But first, let’s discuss what makes coffee such a hot topic widely disputed in today’s health circles.

Attacking Heart Disease

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | March 6th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging | tags: alternative therapies, cardiac arrest, cardiac event, cardiology, chest pain, death, diet, exercise, heart, heart attack, heart disease, inflammation, mortality, natural medicine, pericarditis, Western-Medicine, Yoga

Attacking Heart Disease

Valentine’s Day and American Heart Month may be over, but I’m still thinking a whole lot about hearts. Around the time others were opening up heart-shaped boxes and eating heart-shaped chocolates, my husband’s heart was being examined and analyzed by a team of heart specialists.

8 Steps to Reversing Diabesity

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | February 16th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Green Living | tags: belly fat, cancer, chronic health conditions, dementia, depression, detox, diabesity, diabetes, diet, Dr. Mark Hyman MD, epidemic, fasting blood sugar, food, glucose, healthy-eating, heart disease, high blood pressure, insulin resistance, kidney failure, life expectancy, liver disease, metabolic syndrome, nervous system, nutrition, obesity, overweight, pre-diabetes, stress, stroke, supplements, The Blood Sugar Solution, toxins, type 2 diabetes

Diabesity

Last week I began a discussion about a modern epidemic, a deadly disease that one of every two Americans has, a disease that’s making us fat and sick. And 90 percent of those affected don’t even know they have it!

This disease is diabesity, the continuum of abnormal biology that ranges from mild insulin resistance to full-blown diabetes.

Why You Should Not Stop Taking Your Vitamins

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | November 14th, 2011 | 1 Comment
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging | tags: cardiac, death, health, healthy, heart disease, hormone replacement therapy, HRT, iron, longevity, medical studies, medicine, multi-vitamins, multivitamins, nutrients, nutritional supplements, obesity, oxidative stress, science, scientific study, vitamins

Woman taking a multivitaminDo vitamins kill people?

How many people have died from taking vitamins?

Should you stop your vitamins?

It depends. To be exact, it depends on the quality of the science, and the very nature of scientific research. It is very hard to know things exactly through science. The waste bin of science is full of fallen heroes like Premarin, Vioxx and Avandia (which alone was responsible for 47,000 excess cardiac deaths since it was introduced in 1999).

That brings us to the latest apparent casualty: vitamins. The recent media hype around vitamins is a classic case of drawing the wrong conclusions from good science.

The Not-So-Sweet Truth About High Fructose Corn Syrup

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | September 20th, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: Archer Daniels Midland, artificial sweetener, cancer, cane sugar, Cargill, corn industry, corn sugar, corn syrup, cornfield, diabetes, diet, dietary, dr. mark hyman, food industry, fructose, glucose, healthy-eating, heart disease, HFCS, high fructose corn syrup, industrial agriculture, inflammation, insulin, lipogenesis, liver failure, mercury, nutrition, obesity, parenting, sucrose, tooth decay, weight gain

High Fructose Corn SyrupIf you can’t convince them, confuse them.
— Harry Truman

The current media debate about the benefits (or lack of harm) of high fructose corn syrup in our diet misses the obvious. The average American has increased his consumption of HFCS (mostly from sugar-sweetened drinks and processed food) from zero to more than 60 pounds per year. Obesity rates have more than tripled and diabetes incidence has increased more than seven-fold. HFCS is not perhaps the only cause, but one that cannot be ignored.

Doubt and confusion are the currency of deception, and they sow the seeds of complacency. Recently, these have been used skillfully through massive print and television advertising campaigns by the Corn Refiners Association’s attempt to dispel the “myth” that HFCS is harmful and assert through the opinion of “medical and nutrition experts” that it is no different than cane sugar. It is a “natural” product that can be a healthy part of our diets when used in moderation.

Except for one problem: Even when used in moderation, it is a major cause of heart disease, obesity, cancer, dementia, liver failure, tooth decay and more.

The Unseen Benefits of Physical Fitness

The FIRM Master Instructor Team by The FIRM Master Instructor Team | April 8th, 2011 | 5 Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging, Weight Loss | tags: aging, anxiety, benefits of physical fitness, blood pressure, body composition, bone health, cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiovascular, cholesterol, depression, diabetes, diet, exercise, Fitness, flexibility, health, heart disease, life span, longevity, metabolic syndrome, metabolism, muscular endurance, nutrition, obesity, osteoporosis, sarcopenia, the firm, uscular strength, weight-loss, working out, workout

Fitness BenefitsMost of us pursue fitness in order to look good. In this quest, we run an extra mile to lose five pounds or pick up a heavier weight to trim our arms. A balanced fitness program and sensible eating habits are powerful tools for weight loss. However, the same tools we use to look our best and lose weight are also powerful tools in maintaining the quality of our lives and our health.

What is physical fitness? Physical fitness includes five health-related components: muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiorespiratory fitness, flexibility and body composition. The FIRM workouts are designed with these components in mind. Once you’ve begun to see results on the scale, in your jeans and with your tape measure, what are the benefits you don’t see?

What’s Missing from the New Vitamin D Recommendations?

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | January 26th, 2011 | 2 Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: autoimmune disease, bone density, calcium, cancer, dairy, dark leafy greens, depression, diabetes, diet, Dietary Reference Intakes, doctor, DRIs, fibromyalgia, fish, genetics, health, heart disease, immune system, influenza, Institute of Medicine, intake, IOM, IU, medicine, milk, nutrition, physician, science, skeletal systems, studies, sun, sunlight, the flu, thyroid, Vitamin D

Vitamin D capsulesOne day, vitamin D seems like the cure for everything, and the next, we are inundated with warnings about dangers and lack of science. Confusion is rampant about the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for Calcium and Vitamin D recently released from the Institute of Medicine.

Why Eating a Low-Fat Diet Doesn’t Lead to Weight Loss

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | August 18th, 2010 | 2 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: aging, Alzheimer's, appetite, belly, blood sugar, calories, cancer, cholesterol, diabetes, food, genes, glucose test, glycemic load, heart disease, hormones, hunger, insulin, low-fat diet, medical study, metabolism, nutrigenomics, obesity, overweight, triglycerides, waist, weight-loss

Man on scaleDespite the common observation that obesity runs in families, genetic research shows that the habits you inherit from your family are more important than the genes you inherit. Obesity genes account for only 5 percent of all weight problems. So, we have to wonder, what causes the other 95 percent of weight problems?