Green Living | pg.2

How To Green Your School

E.B. Boyd by E.B. Boyd | July 30th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Green Living | tags: children, compost, composting, eco, eco-conscious, education, education and recycling, environmentally friendly, go green, green, green kids, Green Living, green-power, kids, landfills, parents, recycle, recycling bins, reduce, reuse, school, school recycling program, teachers

School recycling program

It’s back to school time for most families, which means it’s a great time to think about how your school is doing on the green front — especially when it comes to the basics, like recycling.

If your school doesn’t already have a recycling program in place, consider starting one. Experts say the general steps to follow are:

Is Neuro-Conservation the New Hope for Environmental Messages?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | April 24th, 2012 | 12 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: attention deficit disorder, climate change, conservation, Eco Travel, environment, environmental media, environmentalism, forests, fossil fuels, global-warming, Great Pacific Garbage Patch, green, Green Living, green settings, happiness, health, HOPE, hopeful, hopefulness, nature, neuro-conservation, public health, travel, well-being, wellness

Letourneau Creek

Big wads of plastic in the ocean that stretch for miles and disintegrating polar ice caps are the kind of news stories that tend to make us feel hopeless regarding conservation efforts. Why bother to change our light bulbs to compact fluorescents if our planet’s imminent demise is a speeding train that can’t be stopped?

The reason we have these feelings is probably the work of environmentalists themselves. They’re sending the wrong messages, if you ascribe to the new field of neuro-conservation.

Instead of focusing the spotlight on results of scientific studies that prove our planet is rapidly warming, or on statistics about alarming species extinction rates, they should be talking about how an ocean view will make us feel happy or standing among trees will arouse our feelings of peacefulness.

After all, selling us emotions is what marketing professionals have been doing for decades. They know that we don’t just buy a car; we buy how that car makes us feel — wealthier, greener or more in control. Using the tenets of neuro-conservation may just be the boost that environmentalists need to gain support for their causes in a world that’s overrun with more scientific data than we know what to do with — or pay attention to.

Celebrate Earth Day — At Home!

Cheryl Terrace by Cheryl Terrace | April 20th, 2012 | 4 Comments
topic: Green Living, Healthy Home | tags: apartment, carbon emissions, chemicals, Earth Day, eco-home, energy, environment, green cleaners, green home, Green Living, house, house plants, houseplant, LED lighting, lightbulbs, non-toxic cleaning supplies, organic bedding, organic food, organic sheets, organic towels, planet, plastic, toxic, water conservation

Earth Day Home BlogWith only a couple days to go until Earth Day, prepare to get inundated with a billion things we can do — should do — to save our planet. Although there will likely be plenty of events to attend and planet-themed parties to enjoy, one of the best places you can celebrate Earth Day is in your own home!

If our homes are a reflection and expression of our lifestyles and values, then it makes sense that we start making conscious (i.e. green) choices at home. The issues affecting the Earth — from the oil crisis to water shortages to disappearing species — are complex, and can seem distant and insurmountable, but it is essential to understand the correlation between our everyday environments and our larger ecosystem. Everything and everyone is interconnected, and even the simplest act, such as turning the water off when we brush our teeth, creates positive change.

Earth Hour 2012: Will Giving 60 Minutes for the Planet Matter?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | March 2nd, 2012 | 5 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Beyond the Hour, biofuels, carbon offsets, climate change, Earth Hour, environment, environmental awareness, fluorescent light bulbs, global-warming, Green Living, interconnectedness, nature, polar-bears, sea turtles, social-media, Tigers, travel, twitter, wildlife, World Watch Institute, World Wildlife Fund

Sea turtel

To support what’s being billed as the “largest environmental event in history,” all you have to do is turn off your lights for one hour on Saturday, March 31, at 8:30 p.m., your local time. That’s it. It’s probably the easiest thing you’ve ever been asked to do for the planet and the natural world.

The request is a simple one because the World Wildlife Fund, the organizer of Earth Hour, is counting on millions of other people to do the same thing in a cascade around the globe, from New Zealand to Hawaii. And by using the power of our digital interconnectedness throughout the world, it’s hoped we’ll make a bigger statement — via social media — to those in positions of power about our concern regarding the Earth’s changing climate and the effect it’s having, especially on wildlife such as polar bears, tigers and sea turtles.

But in the end, will Earth Hour — and the 60 minutes you spend in the dark — really make a difference?

14 Stellar Spots to See the Stars

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | August 19th, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Eco Travel | tags: Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, archaeoastronomy, Arizona, astronomy, astrophotography, Atacama Desert, Australia, Bryce Canyon National Park, California, camping, celestial, Chaco Canyon, Chaco Culture National Historic Park, Cherry Springs State Park, Chile, conservation, Eco Travel, ecotourism, europe, Flagstaff, galaxies, Galloway Forest Park, Goldendale Observatory State Park, Green Living, Haleakala National Park, hawaii, hiking, Hungary, International Dark Sky Association, International Dark Sky Community, Lake Tekapo, light pollution, Mackinaw City, Maui, Mauna Kea, Milky Way, Mont-Megantic International Dark Sky Reserve, Mount Cook, Mount Haleakala, National Park Service, New Mexico, New Zealand, NSW, Pennsylvania, planets, protection, Quebec, Scotland, stargazing, Starlight, stars, telescope, The Headlands, trip, UK, UNESCO Starlight Reserve, United Kingdom, urban sprawl, Utah, vacation, Washington, Wiruna, Zselic Starry Sky Park

Milky Way from Atacama Desert, Chile

Ecotourism often focuses on vanishing natural resources, such as rainforests and glaciers. It’s not often, though, that we think of looking up when we ponder the fate of the natural world under threat. Yet the starry night sky is disappearing as rapidly from human experience as vast tracts of the Amazon or the Arctic ice cap.

Light pollution is growing at the rate of four percent per year, according to the International Dark Sky Association. It is so pervasive that if you were to stand on the observation deck of the Empire State Building, you would see less than one percent of the stars that Galileo Galilei saw through his telescope in 1610.

Part One of this series explored the movement to protect the earth’s natural nightscapes. Here in Part Two, you’ll find suggestions for stargazing destinations that will open up the universe to whole new realms of perception. Escape the orange glow of interstates, car dealerships and mall parking lots, and discover the wonders of our twinkling galaxy!

The Path to Love and Sustainability

Annie B. Bond by Annie B. Bond | November 15th, 2010 | 1 Comment
topic: Green Living, Inspirational Media, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: Annie Bond, autumn, biodiversity, Deepak Chopra, emotions, fall, farming, food, Green Living, healthy-eating, heart, heirloom, local, love, loving, meal, organic, Relationships, soil, sustainability, sustainable

Bucket of cornThe Path to Love

Our materialistic worldview has reduced love to a haphazard flow of hormones coupled to psychological fantasies. The spiritual truth is very different. Once the walls fall down, we discover that our real problem is that there is too much love around us, not too little. Love is eternal and unbounded; it is only we who take tiny sips from its infinite ocean.

The (Bike) Path to Peace of Mind

Kim Fuller by Kim Fuller | June 8th, 2010 | 7 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Fitness, Green Living, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth | tags: biking, commuting, conscious, Green Living, health, peace of mind

Bike CommuteThere are some things in life that give you that extra edge — the play between ease and exhilaration that leaves you feeling balanced and inspired. They are the pieces of your day that not only keep you going, but boost you to your best self.

Don’t Let Eco-Green Make You See Red

Cheryl Terrace by Cheryl Terrace | April 20th, 2010 | 2 Comments
topic: Green Living | tags: eco, eco-design, eco-details, Green Living, green news, green-issues, news

In honor of the 40th Anniversary of Earth Day, I present …  a tomato powered lamp!

OK, this seems a little bit out there … and is one of the reasons, lately, when I hear “green,” I see red!

Lime.com Is Now Part of Gaiam Life!

Gaiam Staff by Gaiam Staff | April 13th, 2010 | 1 Comment
topic: Gaiam Happenings, Green Living | tags: Fitness, Gaiam Life, Green Living, healthy living, Lime, Personal Growth, Relationships, wellness

If you know Gaiam Life, you probably know Lime.com. It’s a fun, fresh site that brings you “healthy living with a twist” just like Gaiam Life. That’s why we’re excited to announce that Lime.com has merged with GaiamLife.com. It’s a good fit — both sites offer reliable, seriously interesting information on green living, wellness and personal growth. Gaiam Life is like Lime with a makeover: great personality with a new look.

Planting a Seed of Eco-Change

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | April 12th, 2010 | 2 Comments
topic: Green Living | tags: change, climate change, environment, environmental, environmentalist, Green Living, recycle, reuse

A friend recently confided in me that she, too, was increasingly alarmed by news of climate change, water shortages, chemicals in our kids’ toys — letting me know she was prepared to take action. From now on, she announced triumphantly, she planned to reuse gift bags. “And if people think that means I can’t afford new ones, well … that’s fine.”