GERD

10 Reasons to Quit Your Coffee

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | July 6th, 2012 | 8 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: 5-HIA, acidity, addiction, antioxidants, blood sugar, caffeine, cardiovascular disease, catecholamines, cholesterol, chronic disease, coffee habit, cortisol, detox, diabesity, diet, diterpenes, doctor, dysbiosis, energy, GERD, glucose levels, glycemic index, health, healthy, heart burn, heart disease, Huffington Post, indigestion, inflammation, insomnia, insulin resistance, Mark Hyman, nutrition, serotonin, sleep, stress, triglycerides, type 2 diabetes, withdrawal

10 Reasons to Quit Coffee

Coffee: Is it good or bad for us? You might get media whiplash trying to figure that out. The truth is, I find this subject to be as confusing as you probably do.

After all, the media certainly doesn’t help clarify whether America’s favorite morning beverage is going to land you in the doc’s office or set you free with a clean bill of health. It’s no wonder so many of you shrug your shoulders in utter confusion as you refill your morning mug and get on with your day!

I know all about this adoration of coffee. I, too, was smitten and enamored with Coffea Arabica. We had our courtship during the 1990s, when I worked more than 80 hours in the emergency room and saw 30 to 40 patients a day.

I traded sleep for espresso, authentic energy for Haagen Daz coffee ice cream and normal circadian rhythms for high-speed, caffeinated adrenaline rushes.

But then, my body began to communicate to me what I had been attempting to ignore — that I needed to slow down and let the natural systems assume their proper course. You can read more about how I successfully turned my health around here.

As I began to tune into my body and provide it with what it really wanted — fresh, whole, real, unprocessed foods; sleep; relaxation; and the time to enjoy the life I had created for myself and my family — I was able to break up with coffee and make up with my health.

You can too, and I’m going to tell you how. But first, let’s discuss what makes coffee such a hot topic widely disputed in today’s health circles.

3 Simple Steps to Eliminate Heartburn and Acid Reflux

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | March 10th, 2011 | 3 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging, Healthy Eating | tags: abdominal pain, absorption, acid reflux, acid-blocking medications, alcohol, anemia, bacteria, bloating, caffeine, calcium, celiac disease, cigarettes, citrus, Clostridia, dairy, deficiency, dementia, depression, DGL, diarrhea, diet, digestion, drugs, enzymes, esophagus, fatigue, food, food allergies, Food sensitivities, fried food, gas, gastroesophageal reflux disease, GERD, glutamine, gluten, H. pylori, health, heartburn, Helicobacter pylori, hiatal hernia, IBS, irritable bowel syndrome, licorice, magnesium, Mark Hyman, medical, medicine, nerve damage, Nexium, obesity, osteoporosis, overweight, Pepcid, pharmaceuticals, Prevacid, Prilosec OTC, probiotics, relaxation, side effects, small intestine, smoking, sphincter, spicy, stomach, stomach acid, stress, tomato, upper endoscopy, upper GI, valve, vitamin B12, wellness, Xifaxin, yeast, zinc carnosine

Man with heartburnAre millions of us born with a genetic defect that makes us produce too much stomach acid? Do we just have a major evolutionary design flaw that requires us to take powerful acid-blocking drugs to prevent heartburn and reflux?

I believe that the answer to all of these questions is a resounding “no.”

At least 10 percent of Americans have episodes of heartburn every day, and 44 percent have symptoms at least once a month. Overall, reflux and heartburn (also known as GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease) affect a whopping 25 to 35 percent of the U.S. population! As a result, acid-blocking medications are the third-top-selling type of drug in America today. Two other drugs to treat reflux, Nexium and Prevacid, are among the world’s best-selling drugs and account for approximately $5.1 and $3.4 billion in sales annually.