food addiction

How Diet Soda Makes You Fat

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | April 23rd, 2013 | 2 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: american journal of clinical nutrition, Americans, artificial sweeteners, bad diet, bad foods, belly fat, body weight, brain chemistry, calories, carbs, cholesterol, coca-cola, cocaine, coke, diabetes, diet, diet drinks, diet soda, eat less, exercise, fat, fat storage, fat-free, food, food addiction, food industry, fruit juices, good foods, insulin, loose weight, low-fat food, metabolism, moderation, no-calorie drinks, obese, obesity, overweight, politics, processed foods, protein, run, sick, sugar, sugary drinks, supersize, taste buds, type 2 diabetes, willpower

How do you lose weight? Substitute diet drinks for sugary drinks. Eat low-fat foods. Just eat less of the bad foods — it’s all about the calories. We are told, “Just have more willpower.”

These ideas are false. They are food- and diet-industry propaganda that makes and keeps us fat and sick. Lies by the food industry combined with bad government policy based on food industry lobbying are the major causes of our obesity and diabetes epidemic.

Now, more than 35 percent of Americans are obese, and almost 70 percent are overweight. This is not an accident but the result of careful marketing and money in politics.

We are told it is all about making better choices. If we all took more personal responsibility, we could stop this obesity and diabetes epidemic. We have been told there are no good or bad foods, that the key to weight loss is moderation. And, of course, if we all just exercised more, all of us would lose weight. These ideas hold us hostage.

Free Seminar! Beyond Addiction: Recovery 2.0

Tommy Rosen by Tommy Rosen | February 18th, 2013 | 3 Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: alcohol addiction, beyond addiction, childhood obesity, destructive behaviors, drug addiction, drugs, family, field of addition, food addiction, freedom, friends, getting clean, heart disease, lies, life beyond addiction, lying, medical pandemics, meditation, modalities of recovery, money addiction, optimal health, recovery 2.0, sex addiction, stress management, Tadasana Festival, the recovery diet, the twelve steps, Tommy Rosen, twisted thinking, type 2 diabetes, vibrant life, Yoga

tommy rosen

What is addiction? How does it feel to be an addict? What does it look like? Is there a way out, a place BEYOND ADDICTION? These critical questions and the way we answer them make the difference between living a life enslaved to destructive behaviors and one of freedom and expansion.

Most people are familiar with addiction to drugs or alcohol, but addiction takes many forms and it is everywhere around us, all the time. At its very core, addiction is any behavior you continue to engage in despite the negative consequences it brings. If we take the time to really look at ourselves and at the world around us, we don’t have to look hard to see it. Addiction is the root of some of the biggest challenges our society faces today. For example, the medical pandemics of childhood obesity, type 2-diabetes and heart disease are preventable lifestyle diseases driven in large part by addiction.

As an addict you feel stuck, incapable of giving up that thing that you “need” to survive, to function. It twists your thinking, your experience of the world. Addiction leaves you lying to your friends, to your family, to yourself. Being an addict is like being in a small dark room where the only exit seems to be locked from the outside.

The truth is that there is a way out, a way BEYOND ADDICTION. Though neither easy, nor a road one travels alone, a life beyond the grips of addiction is very real. At one time I was stuck in that downward spiral, but after 21 years of recovery I am living proof that an expansive and vibrant life beyond addiction can and does exist.

America’s No. 1 Addiction: Food

Jenny Sansouci by Jenny Sansouci | January 22nd, 2013 | 3 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: addicted to food, brain chemicals, cocaine, comfort food, crack, cravings, detox, diet, DNA, dopamine, drug addict, emotional eating, epigenetics, exercise, fat, food addiction, Gaiam Inspirations, gaiam tv, GaiamTV, genes, gratification, healthy-eating, impulse control, meditate, meditation, mind, neurotransmitter, nicotine, nutrition expert, Pam Peeke, physician, pleasure, pre-frontal cortex, receptors, reward center, salt, stress hormones, sugar, The Hunger Fix, Whole Foods

Did you know that the brain has the same chemical reaction to sugary and fatty foods as it does to cocaine or nicotine? According to Dr. Pam Peeke, author of The Hunger Fix, the chemical reaction happens before you even eat the food — all you have to do is think about it!

Dr. Peeke recently appeared on GaiamTV.com’s Gaiam Inspirations to talk about America’s food addiction and how to retrain your brain to make healthier choices. Dr. Peeke’s interest in the topic of food addiction started because of the way her patients talked about food. “I can’t get off this stuff.” “The withdrawal is killing me.” They sounded like drug addicts, and she started to wonder if there was a connection between food and addiction.

She found that there’s a very striking connection — and the same centers of the brain are involved that regulate drug addiction. And, she says, don’t think for a second the food industry hasn’t figured this out.

Food Addiction: Could It Explain Why 70% of Americans Are Overweight?

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | December 7th, 2010 | 6 Comments
topic: Detox, Family Health, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: addictive, alcohol, appetite, calories, childhood obesity, children, detox, diet, disease, drugs, eating, fat, food addiction, food industry, government regulation, Huffington Post, hunger, junk food, kids, labeling, Mark Hyman, menu, michael pollan, nutrition, overeating, overweight, parenting, portion control, restaurants, school lunch, suger, weight-loss, withdrawal

Woman eating doughnuts

Our government and food industry both encourage more “personal responsibility” when it comes to battling the obesity epidemic and its associated diseases. They say people should exercise more self-control, make better choices, avoid overeating and reduce their intake of sugar-sweetened drinks and processed food. We are led to believe that there is no good food or bad food — that it’s all just a matter of balance.