evolution

The Art of Healing

Cynthia James by Cynthia James | April 28th, 2011 | 4 Comments
topic: Personal Growth | tags: abundance, affirmation, anxiety, bad habits, beauty, behavior, beliefs, change, clutter, damage, doubt, emotion, energy, evolution, fear, friends, friendship, growth, healer, healing, health, inner peace, inspiration, intentions, joy, mental, mind, negativity, pain, perfection, Personal Growth, positive thinking, power, psychology, rebirth, renewal, self help, spirituality, support, thought patterns, thoughts, transformation, victim, well-being

The Art of HealingOftentimes people come to me and state that their intention is to heal. The definition of healing is to restore to health and soundness; to set right; restoration of that which is damaged to its normal function; regeneration (spiritual, revival, rebirth); and renewal of any lost part.

“The renewal of any lost part” caught my attention. During challenging times people are often seeking parts of themselves that they think have been lost, stolen or damaged. I believe that we are, inherently, whole, and that at the core of our being, beauty and peace exist. When my clients speak about wanting to heal, we explore the deep desire to remember that they are not broken or damaged goods. We talk about the fact that in every situation there is good and it is leading us back to a state of wholeness. When the Japanese mend broken objects, they fill the cracks with gold. They believe that when something is damaged and has a history, it is more beautiful. What if that were true of us? What if each and every aspect of our life stories was an essential ingredient that made us stronger and more beautiful?

Is Feeding Birds “For the Birds”?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | March 15th, 2010 | 9 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Antarctica, bird feeders, bird seed, bird watching, cleaning bird feeders, climate change, environment, evolution, global-warming, migration, Newfoundland, planting trees

Birds in Newfoundland

One in five Americans considers himself or herself a “bird watcher,” according to a report published by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last summer. Going by the report’s guidelines, in order to qualify as a “bird watcher,” you either had to have taken a trip one mile or more away from home for the primary purpose of watching birds, or you had to have closely observed birds around your house. If you mostly spotted birds passively — while mowing the yard, for example, or while at a zoo — you would not be counted as a “bird watcher.”