encroachment

Would You Live Next Door to a (Non-Human) Predator?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | September 16th, 2011 | 54 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: alaska, animals, bear attacks, biodiversity, bison, bison attack, coast, coastal habitats, Eco Travel, ecosystems, elk, encroach, encroachment, endangered-species, environment, food chain, forests, grizzly bears, habitat destruction, humans, Montana, mountains, National Science Foundation, nature, Nebraska, Northwoods, population, predators, sea otters, sea urchins, sharks, shellfish, terriroty, threatened species, travel, trophic cascade, wild, wild animals, wilderness, wildlife, wildlife corridors, wolf, wolf attack, wolves, Yellowstone National Park

Grizzly Bears

This summer — like almost every summer for the past decade or so — was rife with headlines about people being assaulted by wild animals. “Seven teens attacked by grizzly in Alaska’s Talkeetna Mountains,” read a headline in the Anchorage Daily News on July 25, 2011. And, “Two teenagers have life-threatening injuries after being mauled by a grizzly bear while on a survival skills course in the Alaskan wilderness,” the first line of a Guardian feature informed us.

The italics on the words “mountains” and “wilderness” above, however, are mine. I think it noteworthy where these events took place. Against our ever-increasing penchant for developing remote areas and fragmenting wildlife corridors, the world’s largest predators have been squeezed onto smaller and smaller pockets, with nowhere to go but the mountains and the wilderness. Today, grizzlies, wolves, tigers and lions are having trouble finding room to be grizzlies, wolves, tigers and lions. And, without them, our planet is in big trouble.

Searching for the Sound of Silence: Finding the World’s Quietest Places

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | November 1st, 2010 | 1 Comment
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, Big Bend National Park, civilization, encroachment, Gobi Desert, Gordon Hempton, Hoh Rainforest, Kalahari Desert, Mother Teresa, National Park Service, nature, noise pollution, Olympic National Park, One Square Inch Project, overpopulation, quiet, silence, silent, sound, travel, Washington, wilderness

Hoh National Rainforest

The Hoh Rainforest, Olympic National Park in northwest Washington

In the first part of this two-part blog series, Wendy Worrall Redal explored our vanishing quiet places and what that loss could mean for us. Now she shares the secrets of some of Earth’s most tranquil spots.

Searching for the Sound of Silence: Earth’s Vanishing Quiet Places

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | October 22nd, 2010 | 3 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Cirque of the Towers, civilization, encroachment, Gordon Hempton, National Park Service, nature, noise pollution, overpopulation, quiet, silence, silent, sound, travel, wilderness, Wind River Range, Wyoming

Cirque of the Towers

In this two-part blog series, Wendy Worrall Redal explores our vanishing quiet places and what that loss could mean for us.