eat less

How Diet Soda Makes You Fat

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | April 23rd, 2013 | 2 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: american journal of clinical nutrition, Americans, artificial sweeteners, bad diet, bad foods, belly fat, body weight, brain chemistry, calories, carbs, cholesterol, coca-cola, cocaine, coke, diabetes, diet, diet drinks, diet soda, eat less, exercise, fat, fat storage, fat-free, food, food addiction, food industry, fruit juices, good foods, insulin, loose weight, low-fat food, metabolism, moderation, no-calorie drinks, obese, obesity, overweight, politics, processed foods, protein, run, sick, sugar, sugary drinks, supersize, taste buds, type 2 diabetes, willpower

How do you lose weight? Substitute diet drinks for sugary drinks. Eat low-fat foods. Just eat less of the bad foods — it’s all about the calories. We are told, “Just have more willpower.”

These ideas are false. They are food- and diet-industry propaganda that makes and keeps us fat and sick. Lies by the food industry combined with bad government policy based on food industry lobbying are the major causes of our obesity and diabetes epidemic.

Now, more than 35 percent of Americans are obese, and almost 70 percent are overweight. This is not an accident but the result of careful marketing and money in politics.

We are told it is all about making better choices. If we all took more personal responsibility, we could stop this obesity and diabetes epidemic. We have been told there are no good or bad foods, that the key to weight loss is moderation. And, of course, if we all just exercised more, all of us would lose weight. These ideas hold us hostage.

5 Ways to Beat the Nighttime Nosh

The FIRM Master Instructor Team by The FIRM Master Instructor Team | March 15th, 2013 | 3 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: active relaxation, after dark, avoid TV, break the cycle, calorie allocation, calories, computer, consuming, diet plan, dinner, eat less, eat more, eating patterns, evening activities, fatigue vs. hunger, food after dinner, food before bed, food habits, food journal, food strategies, go to bed, gorge, hunger, inhibitions, junk food, keep busy after dinner, kitchen, knitting, late in the day, late night, late-night noshing, less likely to snack, midnight snacks, nail painting, nighttime eating, nutrition, nutrition expert, obesity, reduced calories, Sara Ryba, self-monitoring, sleepover, snack choices, snack plan, snacking, snacks, successful weight loss, the firm, use your hands, weight problems, weight-loss, weight-loss obstacles, young

by The FIRM nutrition expert Sara Ryba, R.D., C.D.N.

I remember my first sleepover as a young child, when my friend’s mom said we could have a midnight snack. It was so exciting to be able to eat junk food so late at night!

Of course, my opportunities to gorge like that were few and far between. But regular late-night noshing plagues many of us and can cause weight problems if you don’t control it.

Do you find that you consume too many calories after dinner? Are you continually returning to the kitchen for “one more thing”? Do you wake up in the morning annoyed that you snacked too much the night before? If so, you are not alone. Studies have suggested that people feel less inhibited to overdo the snacks after dark.

So, let’s do something about it! Nighttime eating is my weight-loss clients’ single most common obstacle. But it is a challenge worth taking on, as conquering this habit will open the door to long-lasting, successful weight loss.

The Fork Challenge: Slowing Down for a Healthy Body

YOGANONYMOUS by YOGANONYMOUS | February 27th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: break down food, chewing, diet, digestion, digestive system, eat less, food, fork challenge, fork method, healthy-eating, Kurt Johnsen, meals, mealtimes, nutrition, overeating, slow eating, slow food movement, weight-loss, yoganonymous

by Kurt Johnsen

You’ve seen them. You may even be one of them — I know I have been. I’m talking about those folks hunkered over their food, shoveling it down as if someone were trying to take it away. Not only is it unsightly, it’s also unhealthy.

Our digestive system starts in our mouths, not in our stomachs as you may think. Special enzymes in our mouths begin to break down our food and prepare it for digestion from the moment we take a bite. But often, in our fast-paced, fast-food world, many of us — including myself — wolf down our meals and snacks like a greedy seagull, cocking our heads back and gulping down whatever is in front of us. We barely take the time to chew — much less enjoy — our food.